The Hunt Club (Wyatt Hunt Series #1)

The Hunt Club (Wyatt Hunt Series #1)

by John Lescroart

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The Hunt Club (Wyatt Hunt Series #1) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was not impressed with this book. Story ok but drags "too many words" with not much to say. Characters were weak and uninteresting. Ok read if you have nothing else laying around.
Guest More than 1 year ago
And I will read more too. But this is his not-best book. The beginning quarter, and towards the end picked up. But in the middle there was a long, very long stretch where all the characters did was visit each other and talk about what was going on, covering the same ground over and over. Lag is the word. Most Lescroart books are snappingly good, this is the exception. I do like the characters though, and will be glad to read about them again in a new book.
Mahuenga More than 1 year ago
This is the first in a series of three books specifically featuring private investigator Wyatt Hunt. Hunt is a like-able man who surrounds himself with a good team. The book starts with a first-person narrative providing Hunt's backstory. The plot was very well-woven --- lots of potential killers, lots of hidden motives. A satisfying read.
CBPax on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Good mystery but not his best. I love this author though.
mashley on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Good suspense until the end, which is a little contrived.
TerryWeyna on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
John Lescroart starts a new series with The Hunt Club, set in the same universe -- even the same San Francisco, and around same police department -- as his Dismas Hardy and Abe Glitsky books. While it is written with competence, The Hunt Club is disappointing. It lacks Lescroart's usual tension, despite a possible kidnap victim for whom the clock is ticking down. It almost seems as if Lescroart is getting bored with his own writing.The hero of The Hunt Club is Wyatt Hunt, a San Francisco private investigator. The book traces his career from his work with Child Protective Services -- some of the more harrowing and interesting scenes in the book concern this work, but they're nothing but preface -- to his decision to hang out his own shingle. With his connections to Dismas Hardy and his law firm, the PI venture is a success from the very beginning. It doesn't hurt that Hunt has a strong connection to the police department in the person of Devin Juhle, a homicide inspector.The real plot of the book starts about 50 pages in, when a federal judge is found shot dead in his home study -- along with his young and beautiful lover. Shortly thereafter, Andrea Parisi, a gorgeous attorney who has been reporting on a local trial for Trial TV disappears. The police start to wonder if Parisi, who has just become a strong romantic interest for Hunt, wasn't the one who killed the judge and his lover. Motive? She was the judge's mistress before the dead woman was.But there are plenty of other suspects, from the judge's wife (who had been unaware of his infidelities) to the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, a union of prison guards (over which the judge had been about to exert federal control due to a variety of abuses, from the mundane financial scams to hideous, torturous treatment of prisoners). The story of the CCPOA could have been very interesting indeed, had Lescroart chosen to develop it; but he does not.And this is true of much of the book: interesting subplots seem about to erupt, but then bubble down again. Not only the CCPOA itself seems like an interesting story, but so does the lawyer who is conflicted about representing the CCPOA, to the tune of millions of dollars in billable work each year. The involvement of Trial TV seems interesting, but is merely a sidebar. There are many ideas here, and many books that could have been written really exploring some of them. But instead, The Hunt Club soon devolves into an almost dead case, with the police suspecting that Parisi did it and then jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge, while Hunt refuses to believe it and keeps looking. Even this doesn't sound like it should be boring; a race against time to find a possible victim of kidnapping should be edge-of-the-seat stuff. But Lescroart loses his way with pages of introspection from one character, agonizing by another character, and the ambitions of a third. By page 400 one is longing for the finish, but that's still far, far away.To read some prime Lescroart, try The First Law. That's a good one. This one isn't.
JustAGirl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another excellent page turner from Lescroart, bringing in a new cast of characters as well drawn as Hardy and Glitsky.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Disappointed!!! Struggled off and on through out. Had me, lost me a few times!!!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Is this book a classic that literature students will be reading 10 years from now? No. Is this a book you will easily put down once you are into it? No. There are books you read for cerebral inspiration, and then there are books you read for pure entertainment. The Hunt Club is pure entertainment. It is a page turner. I agree that the ending is a bit disappointing, not because of who the culprit turned out to be but because of the improbable way this carefully crafted story was rushed to an ending. Nevertheless, I feel this book is a very good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I liked this book in its entirety up untill the ending. The ending which was only five pages, left me very disappointed and rather angry. Don't get me wrong, this was a great book, a great suspenful story, but the ending made me want to throw the book up against a wall.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With some 16 bestsellers to his credit John Lescroart well knows how to plot a thriller. With a multitude of TV and film appearances behind him Guerin Barry certainly knows how to narrate a suspense driven story, and he does it to a T with The Hunt Club. Audiobook fans can sit back, press a button, and know they're going to meet two exciting new characters, sharply drawn by Lescroart and compellingly read by Barry. As is often the case with this author, the opener is a grabber. A federal judge is found murdered - shot to death in his home. However, His Honor didn't die alone - also found is the body of his young mistress. San Francisco can't get enough of reading about this case. Initially, inspector Devin Juhle chalks the killings up to the revenge of a betrayed wife. Of course, it's not as easy as that. Seems there are some others who would also like the judge to breathe his last. Among them is a lovely attorney, Andrea Parsi, who has recently found her moments of fame as a commentator on Trial TV. What's a good story without romance? Wyatt Hunt, Juhle's pal, is smitten with Andrea and doesn't like it one bit when she turns up missing. Never one to pay too much attention to the rules, Hunt rounds up some of his cronies to help him find the missing woman. Little did they know what they'd find as they dug deeper into her disappearance. Surprises and suspense abound with The Hunt Club. - Gail Cooke
harstan More than 1 year ago
In San Francisco, someone murders U.S. Federal Judge George Palmer and his much younger mistress Staci Rosalier in his high income home in the Pacific Heights neighborhood. His wife Jeannette found the bodies and called 911. SFPD Homicide Inspector Devin Juhle immediately assumes that the spouse killed her husband and his lover for cheating on her especially in their home. --- Helped by Dismas Hardy, Wyatt Hunt became a private investigator and opened up the Hunt Club four years ago. He sometimes serendipitously works with his police friend Devin as he is doing right now on the judicial homicide. Hunt uncovers some powerful enemies that Palmer made over the years however, just after finding his girlfriend TV reporter Andrea Parisis has a connection too, she vanishes, making the investigation personal. --- Much of what makes Dismas Hardy and Abe Glitsky so popular is found in the characteristics of the key players of this novel. THE HUNT CLUB starts a fresh series that is less legal and more investigative in nature. Devin and Wyatt make a fine team as the former brings police technology and know how to a case while the latter can go under the law to make other types of inquiries. The support cast including Devin¿s deceased partner (died in the line of duty) add understanding to the two sleuths as much as moving the exciting story line forward. Fans of Hardy-Glitsky will toast the beginning of a long friendship. --- Harriet Klausner