Mojave Crossing

Mojave Crossing

by Louis L'Amour

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Mojave Crossing 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THIS IS ANOTHER GREAT STORY BY LOUIS L'AMOUR.I'VE READ THE SACKETT SERIES UP TO THIS POINT AND I AM LOVING THIS SERIES.YOU SHOULD BUY THE WHOLE SERIES WELL WORTH IT.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a pleasure to read. I have personally hiked through the country that the main characters of this book do, and I have visited the canyons and springs / water holes that are described in this book: they are still there, as they have been for hundreds of years. I point this out because the author nearly always goes to the trouble of researching his books before writing them, which makes for a much better read. I highly recomend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great western about the man Tell Sackett it has many exciting fights and things you love about westerns great book
Patriot1 More than 1 year ago
Always enjoy a good L'Amour western. His descriptions of the land and people take you back to different a world and a different way of living.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoy it
Angie_Lisle More than 1 year ago
William Tell Sackett is not my favorite of the Sackett fellas. There's something about him that annoys me; maybe it's all the stupid decisions he makes, like wandering through the desert with no water and no exact idea of where water can be found. Why didn't he double back and get behind the crooks following him? It's the little things that make or break a man. I know I definitely wouldn't hire Tell to be my guide through the west. I spent three-quarters of the book wondering where Tell's gal disappeared to, even though I don't like Ange and wasn't put out by not reading about her. I thought I had messed up the chronology of the series but then, near the end of the story, L'Amour explains her absence. It would've been nice to know that information earlier. The biggest appeal (for me) about this story is that one of the antagonists is a female, the first time we've seen L'Amour break the "girls are sugar and spice" ideology (and her involvement is obvious so this isn't a spoiler). And it was a pretty good crime too, if only she'd gotten away with it. We also meet Nolan Sackett in this story and hear about him being an outlaw. What all has ol' Nolan done, to be branded an outlaw? That's a story I'd like to read.
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