Search the Dark (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #3)

Search the Dark (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #3)

by Charles Todd

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Customer Reviews

Search the Dark (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #3) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I discovered Charles Todd last year after searching for innovative writers in the mystery genre on this web page and what I discovered is by far one of the most interesting and challenging mysteries of the new age. I love the details about WWI and the complexities of the ghost Hamish in the inspectors head. These are mysteries which invoke comparisons to Henry James and even the great Sigmund Freud. Todd has done for mysteries what Delillo has done for modern fiction, that is to say that it is beautiful, complex and intelligent. In short a fascinating read.
Stepupgramma More than 1 year ago
Discovered Charles Todd (well and his Mom who co-writes with him) and read the entire Bess Armstrong series - Clever - interesting - enjoyable. Started reading the Ian Rutledge series - and even though it has dark moments - the characters are good - the plots are intriguing - my only complaint is - he ((they) are repetivtive too much of the writing. Describing the same feelings of the same person multiple times - telling the history of something the same. You get past it - but sometimes it is annoying. Will continue to read the series - hopefully it will get better from the standpoint of readability.
Onthefly More than 1 year ago
Flowed a lot better than 1 & 2. My Scottish is improving with Hammish! Still, the conversations weigh heavily. Not a simple read for busy places where you can't concentrate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed all of the Inspector Rutledge Series books that I have read so far. I plan on reading all of them.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rutledge is a very complex detective with a very complex case. You don't know who, what, or why until the last few pages. I'm really looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldn't put it down!!!
cathyskye on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Protagonist: Inspector Ian RutledgeSetting: southern England at the end of WWISeries: #3In 1919, a former soldier is arrested for murder in the village of SingletonMagna after the battered corpse of a young woman is found nearby. Withdrawnand suicidal, the suspect will speak to no one, and the police call ScotlandYard for help in finding the two young children who may have been in thedead woman's care. Rutledge arrives, still carrying in his head the voice ofHamish MacLeod, a Scottish deserter whom he executed during the war andwhose harsh conscience-like presence in the inspector's mind seems to softenas the story progresses. In his investigation, Rutledge meets others whosespirits were ravaged in the war: Simon Wyatt, leader of the local gentry,who has abandoned his plans to serve in Parliament; his French wife,unaccepted by the villagers; Wyatt's former fiancée, who may not have givenup her expectations; a young local man whose head wound has left himmentally diminished; and an independent young woman from London. Thediscovery of a second woman's battered corpse further complicates Rutledge'stask--which is rooted as much in love as it is in war.This series is extremely well-done. Todd does a brilliant job of portrayinga country and its people shattered by a devastating war. Although I found itall too easy to figure out whodunit, I enjoyed the immersion in another timeand place. Unfortunately, the time and the place are so bleak that it wouldbe impossible for me to read these books back to back.
AdonisGuilfoyle on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Much better than the previous Inspector Rutledge novel, 'Wings of Fire' - the pacing is tighter (relatively speaking), the characters are sympathetic, and we learn more about Rutledge's personal history. Hamish is also becoming a character in his own right, which is fascinating, but slightly worrying for the poor Inspector! (I love how his ghost varies between Rutledge's conscience and a Watson-like sidekick, depending on how unsettled the detective is by the case at hand. The psychology behind Hamish's 'voice' is interesting to think about.)Rutledge is once again dispatched by his boss, 'Old Bowels', to a far flung corner of the English countryside to investigate what appears to be the murder of an estranged wife and the disappearance of two children. Of course, he finds it's never as simple as he's been told, and soon he is investigating two murders and the secrets of a small Dorset village. The ending, once again, is rather contrived, but I enjoyed the series of red herrings packed into the final chapters - from 'Too obvious!', to 'what an anti-climax', until finally getting to, 'I didn't see that coming!' I love mysteries that make the reader think back through the novel, picking up clues and re-reading crucial scenes, and this didn't disappoint. Again Rutledge discovers that he is not the only man still haunted by the war, and is charmed by the lovely French wife of the local landowner. Todd's characters are much the same - strong women, broken men - but he infuses these figures with so much human frailty and depth of emotion that it's hard not to care for them. And the setting, of both time and place, is picture-perfect once again. Charles Todd rarely trips up, even on the smallest detail, and when he does, any mistakes can usually be attributed to the American editing of his writing.I'm glad I have the next book in the series to hand!
sallyawolf on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Search The Dark by Charles ToddInspector Ian Rutledge is sent to a small town to find two missing children but instead of answers he finds more questions. Even though he is constantly haunted by a ghost from his past the inspector expertly wades though the evidence to find the real truth. This is a mystery book so there are several crimes to solve. I found that about halve way though I was yelling at the pages saying all right that's enough time to solve. The clues were subtle but obvious and a casual gumshoe would get it right away. That said I love the fell of this book and would recommend it to anyone who likes mysteries.
cameling on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Our war damaged Inspector is once again sent out by his boss to look into the murder of a woman and her missing children. The village police chief, resenting Scotland Yard's intrusion into his territory, believes he's arrested the murderer but Inspector Rutledge appears to harbor doubts. In speaking with the prisoner, he discovers another war damaged soul, but the man is horrified and shocked by what he believes he has done and cannot be drawn into speaking at length about his wife and children without collapsing in catatonic grief. But where are these missing children? And what of the man who was seen with them? At the same time, another body is found. Is there a connection?
kaylol on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It's a quite good case
richardderus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
What on Earth are the murders of some seemingly unrelated women in the Dorset countryside to do with Scotland Yard? Well, as always, Ian Rutledge and his internal nemesis Hamish are sent where the Yard thinks they stand the best chance of getting rid of them (though the only one they KNOW they're getting rid of is Ian). As always, strict instructions are issued for Rutledge to avoid antagonizing the powerful people involved in this case; as always, he fails; and as always, Rutledge and Hamish bring home the bacon (bad pun--there's a fire in this book that crisps Rutledge a bit) with some tidy last-minute inspiration.But the book's characters, the book's post-WWI England, the book's solid construction provide a happy experience for the seasoned veteran of the Mystery Wars, and a soothing, orderly sense that the guilty will suffer. (My, how they're going to suffer in this book, and not just the murdering guilty. It's *very* subtly, nicely imagined, and almost perfectly executed. I smiled my most Schadenfreude-laden smile those last 20pp.)I don't think the series will appeal to everyone, especially those who find mental challenges unpleasant reading, but the books offer a lot of pleasures of atmosphere and of justice served. I hope many more of you will give them a shot soon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an interesting story. It's winding through the minds of war survivors and it reveals their fears.
DFY More than 1 year ago
Good read. Todd makes you work to figure out who did it. Nice Scottish color and some humor to balance dark crimes.
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