Side Effects

Side Effects

by Amy Goldman Koss

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Side Effects 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 53 reviews.
EdNY More than 1 year ago
Even though she's feeling great, her swollen glands force twelve year old Isabelle to visit her doctor who immediately sends to her Children's Hospital for CAT scans and biopsies. It turns out that she's got lymphoma, requiring a hospital stay and eight rounds of chemotherapy. Her hospital stay will be short, just for her first round of chemo, and then she'll get them on an outpatient basis. Her hospital roommate is Carrie, who has sickle cell and comes to the hospital only when it flares up. Carrie shows Isabelle the hospital ropes and introduces her to some of the kids who are there for sickle cell, leukemia, lymphoma and other diseases. Side Effects by Amy Goldman Koss, author of The Girls and Poison Ivy, takes readers through the last six months of Isabelle's eighth grade year, detailing the chemo regimen and the side effects (nausea, hair loss, etc.). Readers live her life, reacting to her treatments, understanding her desire to sleep and skip school and be a lazy slug. More telling are the ways Isabelle and her family, friends and classmates react. Izzy tries to be her normal self, being as strong as she can be, cracking jokes. Her mother cries 24/7. He father quotes remission statistics success rates. Her Aunt Lucy is the only logical one, trying to treat Izzy the same as always. Her friend Kay is always by her side. However, some of her classmates are less understanding, creating a vulgar video mocking people with cancer. Koss even describes the various doctors, nurses and social workers, some honest, some treating patients like babies, some indifferent. Koss's writing is direct. She doesn't white wash anything, yet she isn't negative or depressing. Side Effects, despite the subject, is hopeful. Regardless of whether or not you know anyone with cancer, you can relate to Izzy. You love her for herself. You sympathize with the agony that her parents are enduring. You admire Kay. It can't be easy watching Izzy's hair fall out, yet Kay stands by her friend. You might think it odd that there's a love interest in such a book, but it is there and adds to the hopeful attitude. I liked Koss' writing from having read The Girls. I like it as much now for having tackled such a difficult subject so effectively, for having produced a novel that teens with cancer or without it can read, understand, relate to and enjoy. Yes..even enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I have re-read it so many times I've lost count. The way Izzy copes with her cancer with a "teenage outlook." She is annoyed that people treat her like a child. And Izzy doesn't want to be known as the "Cancer Kid." I would recomend this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was a little different than I had anticipated. I was expecting something a little humourous yet it was still more sad than expected. But, once again, it was a book I couldn't put down. I actually learned a lot from this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
OMG!!! This book was absolutley AMAZING!! This is my favorite book. I was sooo sad when I finished it cuz its super short. But I'm definatley gonna read it again!!! AMAZING AMAZING AMAZING!!! READ IT!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm 16 years old, and my boyfriend was just diagnosed with cancer. Most of the time I don't even know what to do and then I started reading this. It reminded me so much of what I am going through now and it helped a lot.
softballsarah17 More than 1 year ago
i read this book 4 times and i love it!!
Cougar_H More than 1 year ago
The book Side Effects is a really good book and worth reading over again. It¿s a suspenseful book that will keep you from putting the book down. I would recommend this book to anyone that likes sad, interesting and most of all funny kind of books. Also because it might mean something to people, because it¿s about a girl that has cancer and is very daring and adventurous. Her friend Kay supports her in many things. Another reason I would recommend this book to people because it¿s a ¿must read book¿ when I first saw it , it didn¿t look that good but when I started reading it I could not put it down. As I said. It¿s a meaningful book that will make you realize that you should appreciate your life and your friends and family in it. Also I would recommend it because I would say its one of the best books I have read so far and that I would read it over again. And I usually don¿t read books over again because books aren¿t really my thing. But Side Effects is a really good book that I would, read over again. If your the age 13 to 100 this is a good book to read. Any age could read this book and its very easy to understand. The main character is really funny to that¿s another reason I would recommend this to someone. As you can see this is a very good book and its recommended to ages 12 to 100. I hope you enjoy the book.
Krystal67 More than 1 year ago
This book was so inspiring, I read it twice. It's a great drama about overcoming the obstacles that life throws at you. 15 year old Izzy (Isabelle) gets diagnosed with lymphoma, a type of cancer, after noticing that she has swollen glands. Her life switched in an instant from worrying about missing a math test to worrying about whether or not she will live or die. Izzy's character is so real in that just looking at the cover, a girl in cargo pants, you know she's relatable. She is also incredibly sarcastic and makes you giggle a little every time she says a wise comment. It's hard to believe that she is only 15 because Amy Goldman Koss creates her to be so relatable to so many different ages of readers. You learn about Izzy's love to draw, her crazy, anal mother, loving and brutaly honest brother, and rock of a father. Also, her best friend who pushes her to move past the bad, and keeps Izzy being herself. Even if she has to scream at Izzy to get out of bed for once. I really enjoyed this book because it inspired me that no matter what life throws my way, I can over come it and deal with it with a positive attitude. It showed me never to lose who I am, and that my family will be there for me, and be honest with me no matter what. Even if they get on my nerves, like Izzy's mom does to her often. I think that this book is a great summer read mainly because its a quick read. An average length book that just flies by with its riveting story line and fun characters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've already read this book (yay for library review clubs!) and I enjoyed it. The text was amusing, and I liked a lot of the dialougue. The book began to deteriorate around the end, though, and I was tempted to put it down.
bluesalamanders on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Teenager Isabella Miller is diagnosed with cancer.Funny, sarcastic, and painful. It's not too graphic, but you still get the gist of what she's going through, from the frustration at the begining when everyone talks around her and forgets to talk to her, to the horrible side effects of the chemo, to having to deal with everyone else's coping methods along with figuring out her own.It's a quick read but it's very moving and the voice rings true.
oapostrophe on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A wonderful realistic story of 15-year-old Izzy who is diagnosed with lymphoma. She's wonderfully sardonic as she deals with her family, especially mom, and her friends reactions to her illness. Despite the gritty reality of the treatments and hair loss the humor keeps you reading and hopeful.
my624persona on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
14-year-old Izzy's life is turned upside down and inside out when she finds out she has cancer, and everyone she knows starts treating her differently--except Kay, her best friend.Side Effects is gripping, devastating, and satisfying, but not uplifting--and that's the whole point. This is not a story of triumph over adversity, and it's not a tragedy with a voiceless victim. It's a story of what happens when life hits, whether you come to terms with it or not. Izzy is a strong, fully dimensional character with an acid tongue, and Koss plunges the reader into Izzy's personal hell with no more apology than Izzy gets when a nurse sticks a needle in for the 5th time, trying to find a vein. Koss's writing takes you from lauging out loud to holding your breath to crying and back to laughing again in a matter of a few paragraphs. There is so much packed in, you won't believe it's only 143 pages when you finish it. Highly recommended for all middle and high school libraries, public library young adult sections.
craigwsmithtoo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A startling perspective about a teenage girl who learns she has cancer. Realistic, yet written with an uplifting tone.
FionaCat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Imagine waking up in the morning, noticing that your glands are a little swollen ¿ then ending up in the hospital that night after your doctor tells you that you have cancer. This is what happens to Izzy Miller in this book. What she thinks will be a simple visit to her doctor ends up sending her into a nightmare of needles, biopsies, body scans and chemotherapy when the doctors discover that she has Hodgkin¿s lymphoma.In most young adult books, the characters with cancer end up dying but Izzy is different. This book takes you through Izzy¿s bewilderment, pain and depression as she battles the enemy within her ¿ and wins. The story takes place in southern California (Izzy is sent to Children¿s Hospital in L.A. and visits Griffith Park, Santa Monica and Vroman¿s bookstore in Pasadena in the course of the story) which makes it seem more real, since most of the locations mentioned are familiar.Although the things Izzy goes through are not pleasant to read about (or imagine happening to you) in the end this is a positive book with a happy ending. If you want to read about a teen¿s struggle with a horrible situation, but don¿t feel like crying at the end of the story, read Side Effects.
abbylibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Izzy has cancer. But this is not one of those tear-jerky teen novels. No, Izzy is battling straight through it, even though some days she feels like maybe she'd rather quit than go through another round of chemo. I didn't find this book to be particularly strong as far as characterization goes. I felt like it was written for the purpose of writing a book about someone who has cancer, but doesn't die. It was good for what it was, but the story and characters fell short for me.
chibimajo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Izzy, short for Isabelle, is diagnosed with lymphoma. The next six months of her life are spent dealing with chemotherapy and battling the cancer. We are there for the first unreal moments when Izzy finds out she has cancer and starts her treatment. The first 2 months are fairly detailed, but the following four fly by in a few pages. There is an afterword from Izzy a few years after she has survived the cancer.
nastad on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I didn't really like this book. It was sort of weird and gross.
EdGoldberg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Even though she¿s feeling great, her swollen glands force twelve year old Isabelle to visit her doctor who immediately sends to her Children¿s Hospital for CAT scans and biopsies. It turns out that she¿s got lymphoma, requiring a hospital stay and eight rounds of chemotherapy. Her hospital stay will be short, just for her first round of chemo, and then she¿ll get them on an outpatient basis. Her hospital roommate is Carrie, who has sickle cell and comes to the hospital only when it flares up. Carrie shows Isabelle the hospital ropes and introduces her to some of the kids who are there for sickle cell, leukemia, lymphoma and other diseases.Side Effects by Amy Goldman Koss, author of The Girls and Poison Ivy, takes readers through the last six months of Isabelle¿s eighth grade year, detailing the chemo regimen and the side effects (nausea, hair loss, etc.). Readers live her life, reacting to her treatments, understanding her desire to sleep and skip school and be a lazy slug. More telling are the ways Isabelle and her family, friends and classmates react. Izzy tries to be her normal self, being as strong as she can be, cracking jokes. Her mother cries 24/7. He father quotes remission statistics success rates. Her Aunt Lucy is the only logical one, trying to treat Izzy the same as always. Her friend Kay is always by her side. However, some of her classmates are less understanding, creating a vulgar video mocking people with cancer. Koss even describes the various doctors, nurses and social workers, some honest, some treating patients like babies, some indifferent.Koss¿s writing is direct. She doesn¿t white wash anything, yet she isn¿t negative or depressing. Side Effects, despite the subject, is hopeful. Regardless of whether or not you know anyone with cancer, you can relate to Izzy. You love her for herself. You sympathize with the agony that her parents are enduring. You admire Kay. It can¿t be easy watching Izzy¿s hair fall out, yet Kay stands by her friend. You might think it odd that there¿s a love interest in such a book, but it is there and adds to the hopeful attitude.I liked Koss¿ writing from having read The Girls. I like it as much now for having tackled such a difficult subject so effectively, for having produced a novel that teens with cancer or without it can read, understand, relate to and enjoy. Yes¿.even enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I have read in a long time, I've read it so many times and it never gets boring. But just to warn you, there are a few curse words in here...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Luv it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This boook is so good its more th good its fannaminal