The Sixteenth of June: A Novel

The Sixteenth of June: A Novel

by Maya Lang

Paperback(Reprint)

$14.40 $16.00 Save 10% Current price is $14.4, Original price is $16. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, April 3

Customer Reviews

The Sixteenth of June: A Novel 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book!!! It's about three people who are all at some sort of crossroads in their lives, and we see how the events of one day can illuminate their feelings and affect what they choose to do. Right from the beginning the three main characters are very three dimensional and don't just feel like stereotypes.There is a lot of emotion in the story and you can sympathize with what the characters are going through. Since it all takes place in one day the action moves pretty fast, but it is not like an episode of "24" or some other show where so many things happen that it is totally unrealistic. This book is totally real and the ending is satisfying but still leaves you thinking about the characters. I should also mention that I really loved the writing, which can be beautiful in one moment and make you laugh out loud in the next moment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Sixteenth of June builds quietly, beautifully, and then—-as moving as any Joycean epiphany—-astonishes you. When I reached the last page, I felt deeply stirred, because although it pays tribute to Joyce's masterwork, Ulysses, it refuses to become simply a contemporary shadow of it. It's the author's brilliant insights into her characters' individual struggles that makes it compelling, not just its skillful allusiveness. Yes, it serves as a sort of conversation with Joyce's work, but a conversation in which not all sides always agree. One of the epigraphs to the book is a quotation from Virginia Woolf's diary where she gives a fabulously scathing critique of Ulysses. As this novel comes to a close, like Woolf's Mrs.Dalloway, we enter a long, exquisitely conceived party montage (calling it a scene, doesn't do it justice). As epiphanies spark in the characters' minds, I sensed the novel was as much a tribute to Woolf as to Joyce. Woolf's voice, I think, is a significant part, perhaps an essential part, of this conversation too. By the end, that voice, in the final pages, gets heard, and for me, it was truly magical. I highly recommend this book, if you have an affection for the Modernists and like to explore the quiet depths of human experience.