The 3 Little Dassies

The 3 Little Dassies

by Jan Brett, Graeme Malcolm

NOOK Book(NOOK Kids Read to Me)

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Overview

The Three Little Pigs with a twist! In the tradition of her bestseller The Three Snow Bears, Jan Brett finds inspiration for her version of a familiar story in Namibia, where red rock mountains and vivid blue skies are home to appealing little dassies and hungry eagles.

Mimbi, Pimbi and Timbi hope to find "a place cooler, a place less crowded, a place safe from eagles!" to build their new homes. The handsomely dressed Agama Man watches from the borders as the eagle flies down to flap and clap until he blows a house down. But in a deliciously funny twist, that pesky eagle gets a fine comeuppance!

Bold African patterns and prints fill the stunning borders, but it is the dassies in their bright, colorful dresses and hats that steal the show in this irresistible tale, perfect for reading aloud.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780698180253
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 09/21/2010
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 32
File size: 77 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 3 - 5 Years

About the Author

With over thirty four million books in print, Jan Brett is one of the nation's foremost author illustrators of children's books. Jan lives in a seacoast town in Massachusetts, close to where she grew up. During the summer her family moves to a home in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts.

As a child, Jan Brett decided to be an illustrator and spent many hours reading and drawing. She says, "I remember the special quiet of rainy days when I felt that I could enter the pages of my beautiful picture books. Now I try to recreate that feeling of believing that the imaginary place I'm drawing really exists. The detail in my work helps to convince me, and I hope others as well, that such places might be real."

As a student at the Boston Museum School, she spent hours in the Museum of Fine Arts. "It was overwhelming to see the room-size landscapes and towering stone sculptures, and then moments later to refocus on delicately embroidered kimonos and ancient porcelain," she says. "I'm delighted and surprised when fragments of these beautiful images come back to me in my painting."

Travel is also a constant inspiration. Together with her husband, Joe Hearne, who is a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Jan visits many different countries where she researches the architecture and costumes that appear in her work. "From cave paintings to Norwegian sleighs, to Japanese gardens, I study the traditions of the many countries I visit and use them as a starting point for my children's books."


With over thirty four million books in print, Jan Brett is one of the nation's foremost author illustrators of children's books. Jan lives in a seacoast town in Massachusetts, close to where she grew up. During the summer her family moves to a home in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts.

As a child, Jan Brett decided to be an illustrator and spent many hours reading and drawing. She says, "I remember the special quiet of rainy days when I felt that I could enter the pages of my beautiful picture books. Now I try to recreate that feeling of believing that the imaginary place I'm drawing really exists. The detail in my work helps to convince me, and I hope others as well, that such places might be real."

As a student at the Boston Museum School, she spent hours in the Museum of Fine Arts. "It was overwhelming to see the room-size landscapes and towering stone sculptures, and then moments later to refocus on delicately embroidered kimonos and ancient porcelain," she says. "I'm delighted and surprised when fragments of these beautiful images come back to me in my painting."

Travel is also a constant inspiration. Together with her husband, Joe Hearne, who is a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Jan visits many different countries where she researches the architecture and costumes that appear in her work. "From cave paintings to Norwegian sleighs, to Japanese gardens, I study the traditions of the many countries I visit and use them as a starting point for my children's books."

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The 3 Little Dassies 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Booklady123 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Jan Brett¿ The 3 Little Dassies is an African version of The Three Little Pigs. I looked up dassie on the internet and after browsing several sites have come to the conclusion that dassies are rodent like creatures that live among the rocks. They are often referred to as rats, but some sites have compared them to guinea pigs and yet other sites state that they are closely related to dugongs and elephants. At any rate, Brett¿s dassies are three adorable little animals that do battle with the Big Bad Eagle. The story takes place in the Namib Desert. The three dassie sisters: Mimbi, Pimbi and Timbi, leave home to build their own homes. Dressed in traditional African dresses and turbans they are harassed by an eagle (he would be the big bad wolf in the traditional story) who wants to feed them to his eaglets. Like the traditional story, the houses are made of leaves (straw), sticks, and stone (brick). The eagle screeches ¿I¿ll flap and I¿ll clap and I¿ll blow your house in!¿ He manages to catch Mimbi and Pimbi by destroying their homes. When he is unable to destroy Timbi¿s stone house, he decides to be content with just two dassies for a snack, not realizing that the clever little Agama Man (a brightly dressed lizard) has rescued Mimbi and Pimbi. Children will enjoy making the comparisons between the traditional story and Brett¿s version. Readers will be entranced by Brett¿s customary attention to detail in her illustrations. This book would be an excellent addition to a unit on fairy tales. Recommended for Preschool ¿ 3rd Grade
allaboutliteracy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A version of the Three Little Pigs using characters and scenery from Namibia. Beautifully illustrated in Brett's typical style. Would be fun to use as a cousin book to compare and contrast with other versions of the three little pigs.
cmesa1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This Folktale is very similar to the idea of the 3 Little pigs with some twist to the story. Tre is a motif of being 3 dassies and also whe the eagle tells the dassies " I'll flap and I'll clap and I'll blow your house in. The eagle is able to do this for the first two houses but not for the house made out of stone that the dassie builted . It shows that if you work hard you can achive security and you can be rewarded at the end. I like the fact that the book at the end tells the reader that now if you travel to Namibia you will see dassies living in stone houses with agama men looking out for them .
Schuman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Everything you would expect from a Jan Brett book, loved it!! It was a remake of the 3 Little Pigs but instead there were 3 little Dassies (rock rabbits) and the a big eagle. I love the repetition in both stories, as well as the message on how important it is to not rush and be lazy, but instead do the best you can on the first try because it is always better in the long run. Very fun book to read with children and maybe talk about times that they rushed and the results of it. Also the repetition is fun to share and interact with younger students.
ryann0423 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a different version of the 3 little pigs, but this story is told with 3 little dassies (rock rabbits) and the big bad eagle. It is great for read aloud to show children that it is best to take your time and do your best the first time, otherwise you may end up like the 2 dassies whose houses were flapped down by the eagle. It is nice to have a version of the story with boy characters, pigs, and girl characters, dassies.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent. Great job by Jan Brett once again.
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