Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Audio CD(Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours)

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Overview

'Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle.' Curious Alice falls through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with ideas of human perception and logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as with children. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400120277
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 02/15/2010
Edition description: Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours
Sales rank: 1,058,644
Product dimensions: 6.52(w) x 5.54(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 8 - 11 Years

About the Author

English writer and mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was especially known for his children's books Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Besides being classic children's entertainment, they are also distinguished for their satire and verbal wit.The son of a vicar, Carroll was a precocious child who showed early interest in both writing and mathematics. He studied mathematics and was appointed to a lectureship at Christ Church, Oxford. Carroll continued studying and prepared for holy orders for almost thirty years. Although he took deacon's orders in 1861, Carroll was never ordained as a priest. A shy retiring bachelor, Carroll was happiest in the company of children, and his favorite was Alice Liddell, daughter of the dean of Christ Church. On a boating trip up the river Isis, Carroll told Alice and her three older sisters a story of "Alice's Adventures Underground," weaving into it many of the places and things they'd seen on their outings together. Alice was enchanted by the story and begged him to write it down. By the following February, Carroll had written a first draft and decided to publish it as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Although he wrote a wide range of other books, including many on the subject of advanced mathematics, he is best remembered for his children's classics. In addition to narrating audiobooks, Shelly Frasier has appeared in many independent film and theater projects in Arizona and southern California and has developed character voices for animation projects and voiceover work for commercials. She trained at the Groundlings Improv School in Hollywood and South Coast Reperatory's Professional Conservatory in Costa Mesa, California. She has performed at theaters throughout North Hollywood and Orange County. Recent performances include Blue Window, The Battle of Bull Run Always Makes Me Cry, The Haunting of Hill House, and a British farcical version of A Christmas Carol. She resides in Hollywood. Renee Raudman is a multi-award-winning audiobook narrator. A multiple Audie Award nominee, she has earned a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards, including for The Last Secret by Mary McGarry Morris and Wesley the Owl by Stacey O'Brien, as well as a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award for Joe Schreiber's Chasing the Dead. She has also performed on film, TV, radio, and stage, including the recurring roles of Jordon on ABC's One Life To Live, Phyllis on NBC's Passions, and guest-starring roles on prime-time TV. She has been heard in cartoons (The Simpsons, Billy & Mandy), videogames, and on the E! channel. Her narration of Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper was selected by Library Journal as one of the best audiobooks of 2009, and her reading of Marthe Jocelyn's Would You was selected by the ALA as one of the best young adult audiobooks of 2009.

Date of Birth:

January 27, 1832

Date of Death:

January 14, 1898

Place of Birth:

Daresbury, Cheshire, England

Place of Death:

Guildford, Surrey, England

Education:

Richmond School, Christ Church College, Oxford University, B.A., 1854; M.A., 1857

Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE.


ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, "and what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?

    So she was considering in her own mind, (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid,) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a white rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

    There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket or a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

    In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

    The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnelfor some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

    Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

    "Well!" thought Alice to herself, "after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!" (Which was very likely true.)

    Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?" she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think—" (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the school-room, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) "—yes, that's about the right distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?" (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice grand words to say.)

    Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The Antipathies, I think—" (she was rather glad there was no one listening this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) "—but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsy as she spoke—fancy curtsying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere."

    Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss, me very much to-night, I should think! (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get very sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "Do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

    Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

    There were doors all around the hall, but they were all locked, and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

    Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny golden key, and Alice's first idea was that this might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!

    Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; "and even if my head would go through," thought poor Alice, "it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin." For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.

    There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it, ("which certainly was not here before," said Alice,) and tied round the neck of the bottle was a paper label with the words "DRINK ME" beautifully printed on it in large letters.

    It was all very well to say "Drink me," but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry: "no, I'll look first," she said, "and see whether it's marked 'poison' or not:" for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them, such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that if you drink much from a bottle marked "poison," it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.

    However, this bottle was not marked "poison," so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice, (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavor of cherry-tart, custard, pineapple, roast turkey, toffy, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off.


* * *


    "What a curious feeling!" said Alice, "I must be shutting up like a telescope."

    And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going through the little door into that lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this, "for it might end, you know," said Alice to herself, "in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?" And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.

    After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once, but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery, and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried.

    "Come, there's no use in crying like that!" said Alice to herself, rather sharply," I advise you to leave off this minute!" She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it,) and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes, and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. "But it's no use now," thought poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person!"

    Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words "EAT ME" were beautifully marked in currants. "Well, I'll eat it," said Alice, "and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens!"

    She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself "Which way? Which way?" holding" her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.

    So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.

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Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Classic Starts Series) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have a copy of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass which was given to me on my seventh birthday. I found it fascinating. My grandmother gave me a copy along with a harmonica. The harmonica was lost long ago, the book remains and has always had a place in my heart. I was too young to read the entire book, so my father started reading this book to me. Perhaps still having this book has given me a connection to the past. I laugh when I reminisce about my father (who is now 70) singing ¿Beautiful Soup,¿ most beautifully I must add. He also recited ¿Jabberwocky¿ and I can still hear his voice as he read the tale of the Walrus: ¿The time has come,¿ the Walrus said, ¿To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing wax of cabbages and kings and why the sea is boiling hot and whether pigs have wings.¿ The Mad Tea Party is also very memorable. There is all kinds of nonsense talk children will love to try to figure out, and as adults still might be trying to figure out! They will love the riddles and beautiful illustrations. The mouse, the chess pieces and the Cheshire cat talk most intelligently about various concerns in Wonderland. Just as everything in a child¿s world is sometimes alive to them, so Alice¿s world is filled with things that are alive and most interesting to children. Alice never seems to run out of adventures. The Looking Glass House is amusing to me as it has a cute black kitten who is quite mischievous. I quote: ¿Oh, you wicked, wicked little thing!¿ cried Alice catching up the kitten and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace. ¿Really, Dinah ought to have taught you better manners! ¿¿. Kitty sat very demurely on her knee, pretending to watch the progress of the winding, and now and then putting out one paw and gently touching the ball, as if it would be glad to help if it might. John Tenniel¿s illustrations make the book and together he and Lewis Carroll created a magical world for children to explore. I hope you will read this book to your children, read them many books about many things. They will always thank you for it. Thank you Dad, I love you! You have given me so many things, and I thank you for my love of reading. I dedicate this review to my dad who will always live eternally with me as long as I have this book tucked safely away.
barbieleejay More than 1 year ago
Without a doubt a Classic in it own. My daughter loves it and she is !7yrs old. It will entertain ages 0-99..Great investment to add to a home library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book Alice in Wonderland is a very good book. I think that it is a very good book because it is really interesting. It is a really interesting book because it's about this girl who dreams of the craziest things. In my opinion the author which is Lewis Caroll has a very creative and interesting mind. It's amazing how a person could come up with such an idea. If you were an adult that reads the book for the first time, you would think that this girl Alice is on drugs to dream of such things. If you dont think that Alice is on drugs then youll probably think that the author who wrote this book is on drugs. I know that there are a lot of books based on this title, but to me this book is the most original and best one. The book has been around for a while and still selling. The reason why is because it is such a great book. So just dont take my word for it, do some research if you dont believe me. I would defenitely recommend this book to anyone who likes fiction stories of any kind. I bet that this book would really get the attention of kids. So I also recommend this book to childeren. Childeren are not the only people i recommend it to but adults as well. Childeren and adults of all ages who love fiction are guaranteed by my experience and knowlege to really love this book as well as i do. I rate this book four out of five stars. The reason I rate this book four out of five instead of five out of five is because it could have been a little better if the authour would just have made the story a little shorter that way children wont get board. Because as we all know there are more children that will read this book than adults.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ok so as being a fifteen year old grew up loving alice in wonderland. Apparently this book is an acid trip relating to the song White rabbit by Jefferson aiplane says my mom. but the song and movie are great so when i get the chance im picking up this book immediateley.
Guest More than 1 year ago
okay, so i realize that Alice in Wonderland seems like a book for little kids and not someone that's 11 or 12 (I read it last year), but I have still wanted to read it since I learned that it was a book and not just a disney movie. But I was so wrong, it's not even funny. Alice in Wonderland is for any age of person- boy or girl- and is about a girl that has crazy adventures in wonderland. And everything, even if it seems weird- think about it- makes sense. Have you thought about it? Even if the mad hatter and the march hair are terrible and rude, they're also very funny and hares in march are said to be crazy as hatters used to be (just all the time- not just in March)everything is like that. i would reccommend this to anyone and everyone ages 0-????? i think it's healthy for people to read something like thisat least once a month.
sidecar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A lovely edition of one of my favorite stories of all time. I must read this at least once a year to remain sane.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a teenager who has recently finsished reading the book 'Alices Adventure's In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass'. I was really satisfied with this book after reading it. I would have to say that this book is a middle school level. I really enjoyed this book because i know for a fact that the author of this book has got to have a real creative mind to come up with this really great material. I mean for a person to come up with a story which involves a girl having this crazy, interesting dream that keeps the reader hooked on thinking about what is going to happend next and how a little girl could dream of such things is just really amazing in my opinion. In my eyes this book deserves five stars hands down. It's a classic book that keeps all people of all ages loving it. I would reccomend this book to anybody who enjoys fiction type stories or books. I am almost certain that if you are a fiction story fanatic, you will surely enjoy this book. Kids especially will love this book because they all love fiction storys. Storys that are inpossible in the real world. I look forward to reading more of this authors books because i really loved the last book that i read which was Alices Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and author by Lewis Caroll which is a real inspirational and creative person in my mind. I have a feeling that her other books are all probably fiction storys, that dont compare to this book in anyway because its an all time classic that mostly everybody has either read or seen the movie. So to all you fiction lovers out there take a little time to read this book and im sure youll love it and be a satisfied reader once you finish the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I acquired this book over 20 years ago and read it cover to cover over and over again. I can still remember staying up late to memorize the poetry. I am getting this for my 10 year old neice whom reminds me of me in an all to familiar way. I hope that she treasures this book as much as still treasure mine.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's Lewis Caroll Again! But this time He has taken the many adventures of Alice And has put them into the eyes of our Children. Only this time miss Alice finds herself being aproched with difficult questions and life situations and finds out that there is more to the world than just tea parties!