An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (Signed Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition)

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (Signed Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition)

by Hank Green

Hardcover(Signed Edition)

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Overview

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (Signed Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition) by Hank Green

Come discuss An Absolutely Remarkable Thing at our Barnes & Noble Book Club Night, Wed. October 24th at 7:00 PM! Learn more and sign up now.

This is the signed edition. Limited quantities are available. 

The Signed Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition features a reading group guide and exclusive personal essay from Hank Green.

In his much-anticipated debut novel, Hank Green—cocreator of Crash Course, Vlogbrothers, and SciShow—spins a sweeping, cinematic tale about a young woman who becomes an overnight celebrity before realizing she's part of something bigger, and stranger, than anyone could have possibly imagined.

The Carls just appeared. Coming home from work at three a.m., twenty-three-year-old April May stumbles across a giant sculpture. Delighted by its appearance and craftsmanship—like a ten-foot-tall Transformer wearing a suit of samurai armor—April and her friend Andy make a video with it, which Andy uploads to YouTube. The next day April wakes up to a viral video and a new life. News quickly spreads that there are Carls in dozens of cities around the world—everywhere from Beijing to Buenos Aires—and April, as their first documentarian, finds herself at the center of an intense international media spotlight.

Now April has to deal with the pressure on her relationships, her identity, and her safety that this new position brings, all while being on the front lines of the quest to find out not just what the Carls are, but what they want from us.

Compulsively entertaining and powerfully relevant, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing grapples with big themes, including how the social internet is changing fame, rhetoric, and radicalization; how our culture deals with fear and uncertainty; and how vilification and adoration spring from the same dehumanization that follows a life in the public eye.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781524744656
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/25/2018
Edition description: Signed Edition
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Hank Green is the CEO of Complexly, a production company that creates educational content, including Crash Course and SciShow, prompting The Washington Post to name him "one of America's most popular science teachers." Complexly's videos have been viewed more than two billion times on YouTube. Green cofounded a number of other small businesses, including DFTBA.com, which helps online creators make money by selling cool stuff to their communities; and VidCon, the world's largest conference for the online video community. In 2017, VidCon drew more than forty thousand attendees across three events in Anaheim, Amsterdam, and Australia. Hank and his brother, John, also started the Project for Awesome, which last year raised more than two million dollars for charities, including Save the Children and Partners in Health. Hank lives in Montana with his wife, son, and cat.

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An Absolutely Remarkable Thing: A Novel 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous 21 days ago
Couldn't put it down. Fun, engaging, trendy, weird (in a good way) and just plain interesting!! On the edge of my seat through most of it!!
LaynieBee-Blog 25 days ago
I’d like to start this review by making it clear that I have been a Nerdfighter (i.e. a part of the community that rallies around Hank and John, actively works to decrease world suck, and generally allows themselves to experience the joy of being excited about things) since the early days of their YouTube channel. I've since found myself watching their videos less and less, but still supporting their other endeavors. This, however, only sways my opinion slightly. Hank, to me, has always been the “left-brained” brother. I associate Hank with things like SciShow (an informative web series based around scientific topics) and songs about space and the universe. John is the bookish one. The one with the book club. The one with all the quotes about reading. If the brothers were high school teachers, Hank would be math and science and John would handle the English and history. So naturally when I found out Hank was releasing a book, I thought it would be non-fiction. Maybe about the universe, or how science has changed the world. I was very worried when I found out it was fiction. Would it be another John Green novel? Would it live up to the standard that I have come to expect from the Greens? Would I have to pretend to like it while actually DNFing it? So, while I saw the hype, I shied away from learning too much about it. In fact, I didn’t even read the description until after I started the book. I did see pictures of the statues at BookCon, because, well those were hard to miss but I had no idea what I was in for and, honestly, I kind of like that it happend that way. Right off the bat I came to several conclusions. One: This is most definitely not a John Green novel. The age of the protagonist (early 20s) is one of the determining factors of this, as is the SciFi aspect. But the voice is what really sets it apart. The MC of most John Green novels is a incredibly self reflective, almost brooding, introvert with a quirky side. April May, the MC of this novel, is in-your-face spunky and incredibly outgoing. She takes pride in being fun, carefree, and never too serious. Obviously there is some introspection, but usually at the cost of making fun of herself. Two: I wasn’t going to be able to stop reading even if I tried. Much to the dismay of my friends, family, and employer, I walked around in an AART haze until I finished the book. Wait. No. Scratch that. I am still in an AART haze. Hank pulls you into this world that almost feels like it could happen. He makes you feel for the inanimate objects and April May. As April grows and her character arc develops, she starts to point out many things that make you stop and think. About the world. About people. About yourself and what you truly desire and what you are really scared of. What, on the surface, is just a book about a few metal robot statues and a quirky graphic designer turned vlogger is actually both a love letter and a warning to/about the Internet and Internet fame. How it brings people together, but can also tear them apart. About how addictive fame can be and how it feels to continuously chase the next thing that will keep you relevant so as not to lose your audience. April May and the story of the immovable robots that show up in the middle of the night, isn’t actually the story here. This novel is more about the way the community either rallies behind or against them. It’s a story of humanity and togetherness. Working towards a common goal with your fellow man. Looking
Anonymous 27 days ago
Awesome! I hope Mr.Green does a sequel!
Anonymous 28 days ago
Way to go, Hank!!!!!
Piglet11 4 hours ago
Hank Green knocked it out of the park with his first novel! An Absolutley Remarkable Thing was a great and surprising read with twist that I didn't see coming. This book was unpredictable and I couldn't put it down even when I needed to. I can't wait to see what/if Hank Green writes again.
Anonymous 26 days ago
I NEED A SEQUEL! UGH.
Anonymous 4 days ago
Kept me in suspense til the end
Anonymous 11 days ago
great story! hope you write another <3
KannanMN 26 days ago
Good one!!