Around the World in 80 Days

Around the World in 80 Days

by Jules Verne

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Overview

This classic novel has been abridged and adapted into 10 illustrated chapters. This format is ideal for bilingual education - people learning English as a second language (ESL),  English Language Learners (ELL), people of any age intending to improve reading skills and students for whom the original version would be too long or difficult. This learning product is high-interest, low-readability. Readers of this version will improve comprehension, fluency and vocabulary.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780848111441
Publisher: EDCON Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/15/2012
Series: Bring the Classics to Life Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 56
File size: 4 MB
Age Range: 7 - 13 Years

About the Author

Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France and was the eldest of five children. As a child he developed a great interest in travel and exploration, which showed in his writing. After completing his studies Jules traveled to Paris to study law. When his father learned he was writing instead, he withdrew his financial support and Jules had to support himself as a stockbroker. His true talent was in telling stories of extravagant voyages and adventures. He married Honorine de Viane Morel in 1857 and she continued to encourage his writing. Jules met an important French publisher, Pierre Jules Hetzel who helped improve Jules’ writing and published his stories. In 1887 Jules entered politics for the next fifteen years. His books were written before the invention of airplanes, submarines, guided missiles or satellites, and he took his readers all over the world. He died in 1905 with diabetes. In 1989 Jules’ grandson found a novel written in 1863 called Paris in the 20th Century. It was published in 1994.

Date of Birth:

February 8, 1828

Date of Death:

March 24, 1905

Place of Birth:

Nantes, France

Place of Death:

Amiens, France

Education:

Nantes lycée and law studies in Paris

Read an Excerpt

Phileas Fogg did not talk much. He lived in a house on one of the best streets of London. But where did he come from? He had so much money that he did not have to work. But how did he make his money? All that people could tell was that Phileas Fogg did the same things at the same times every day. One morning, Fogg fired his servant for not bringing the newspaper at the right time. That same day another man came asking for the job. He had come from France a long time before. “My name is Jean,” he said. “But people have called me Passepartout. I am good at finding my way out of trouble. I have had too much trouble! I want to live in a place where there are no surprises. I never want to be called Passepartout again!” Fogg did not hear him. He was looking at his watch. “Passepartout, what time do you have?” Passepartout took his watch from his pocket and read the time. “My watch is never off,” he said. Fogg put on his hat. “You have the job. Here is a list. It shows what I will be doing at each time every day. It shows what you must do and when.” Fogg looked at his watch again. “Now is the time I walk to the Reform Club.”

Table of Contents


Notes to the Teacher     4
Facts About the Author     5
Facts About the Times     6
Facts About the Characters     6
Chapter Summaries     7
Answer Key     10
Literary Glossary     12
Chapter Exercises
Words and Meanings, Ch. 1     14
Recalling Details, Ch. 1     15
Synonyms and Antonyms, Ch. 1     16
Words and Meanings, Ch. 2     17
Cause and Effect, Ch. 2     18
Words and Meanings, Ch. 3     19
Sequence of Events, Ch. 3     20
Words and Meanings, Ch. 4     21
Comprehension Check, Ch. 4     22
Inference, Ch. 4     23
Words and Meanings, Ch. 5     24
Recalling Details, Ch. 5     25
Words and Meanings, Ch. 6     26
Sequence of Events, Ch. 6     27
Character Study, Ch. 6     28
Words and Meanings, Ch. 7     29
Cause and Effect, Ch. 7     30
Words and Meanings, Ch. 8     31
Comprehension Check, Ch. 8     32
Words and Meanings, Ch. 9     33
Comprehension Check, Ch. 9     34
Words and Meanings, Ch. 10     35
Sequence of Events, Ch. 10     36
Personalizing Story Events, Ch. 10     37
End-of-Book Exercises
Book Sequence     38
Final Exam, Part 1     39
Final Exam, Part 2     40
Universal Exercises
Beyond the Text     41
Plot Study     42
Theme Analysis     43
Character Study     44
Vocabulary Study     45
Glossary Study     46
Book Review, Part 1     47
Book Review, Part 2     48

Reading Group Guide

Shocking his stodgy colleagues at the exclusive Reform Club, enigmatic Englishman Phileas Fogg wagers his fortune, undertaking an extraordinary and daring enterprise: to circumnavigate the globe in eighty days. With his French valet Passepartout in tow, Verne's hero traverses the far reaches of the earth, all the while tracked by the intrepid Detective Fix, a bounty hunter certain he is on the trail of a notorious bank robber. Set from the text of George M. Towle's original 1873 translation, this Modern Library Paperback Classic of Verne's adventure novel comes vividly alive, brilliantly reflecting on time, space, and one man's struggle to reach beyond the bounds of both science and society.

1. Having been born into a family that had made their living from the sea, Jules Verne spent his early years in a seaport town. When he was still young, Verne himself became a cabin boy on a merchant ship. In what ways do you think these elements of the author's own life may have influenced Around the World in Eighty Days?

2. Verne became very involved with theater while studying law in Paris and is the author of many plays. What elements in this novel do you think came out of Verne's theatrical experiences? After Eighty Days was published, Verne received many requests to dramatize the work. Do you think the book has particularly theatrical elements that would lead to its adaptation as a play?

3. Around the World in Eighty Days is considered one of the most popular adventure novels of all time. What do you think of this characterization and how would you compare it to contemporary adventure novels and films? What elements of the adventure genre have changed overtime, and where do you think today's adventure authors owe a debt to Verne?

4. Although the story begins in London, it eventually spans the entire globe. Despite the international setting, this book is distinctly British in many ways. Why might Verne have chosen a protagonist that is so quintessentially British, while the author himself was French?

5. Verne had an avid interest in science, particularly geology and geography, and was somewhat of an inventor. After having read Around the World in Eighty Days, does it surprise you that Verne is considered by many to be the father of science fiction? Where do you think Verne's scientific expertise adds to the story?

6. For Verne, the world is shrinking; exploration has given way to tourism and imperialism. In his Introduction, Bruce Sterling argues that comments on globalization in Eighty Days are particularly relevant today. Would you agree? What evidence can you find to support this, and what lessons do you think we can learn from this novel today?

7. In many ways, Verne's tale is one about the future, and many of his ideas have come to pass. Now that it is relatively easy to go around the world in eighty days, why is this tale still entertaining and relevant?

8. Many of the characters in the novel have names that in some way illuminate their roles. Why do you think Verne chose to call his hero Fogg, the detective Fix, and the assistant Passepartout, which means skeleton key in French?

9. Why do you think the hero, the mysterious Phileas Fogg, accepts the bet to travel the globe in eighty days?

10. When the book was written, the Parsee Indian Aouda represented the unknown and the exotic, but in many ways she is the character that the modern reader finds most familiar. Do you think this is true? In what ways is she now more modern than many of the other characters?

11. The precise and very British Phileas Fogg and his valet, the comic and very French Passepartout, are strikingly different characters. In what ways do their differences help to elucidate their individual character traits? Why does Verne include this relationship? Most of the time Passepartout is more a hindrance to his employer than helpful. Why do you think Fogg keeps him? In what ways does he serve to advance the plot, particularly with Aouda?

12. In many ways, Fogg's travels are more than just a race around the world but a quest, one in which the hero returns somehow transformed. Do you think Fogg's character is changed when he returns to London at the end of the challenge?

13. At the conclusion of the novel, the narrator asserts that Phileas Fogg in his journey has gained nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men! Verne seems to be making the point that love and human relationships are more important than winning bets or other material gains. Do you think that the rest of the novel would support this assertion? If not, why might Verne have included it?

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