Diary of a Company Man: Losing a Job, Finding a Life

Diary of a Company Man: Losing a Job, Finding a Life

by James S. Kunen

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Overview

James S. Kunen—author of The StrawberryStatement, an account of the 1968 studentuprising at Columbia University—chronicleshis adventures on the road to finding meaningin work and life. He traces his evolution froma rebellious youth who sees working as a kindof death, to a laid-off corporate executive whoexperiences not working as a kind of death,to a reinvented and reinvigorated individualwho discovers something important andmeaningful to do.The experience of falling victim to America'srecession-ravaged economy (and the peoplewho run it) leads him along a career path fardifferent from anything he had planned. Afteryears of making a living, Kunen finally learnshow to make a life. Diary of a Company Manwill be a revelation not only to baby boomersbut to young people trying to figure out whatto do with their lives.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780762770458
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 01/10/2012
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

James S. Kunen is the author of four previously published titles: The Strawberry Statement, Standard Operating Procedure, How Can You Defend Those People?, and Reckless Disregard . He worked as a public defender in Washington, D.C., and as a writer and editor at People magazine before assuming the position of director of corporate communications at Time Warner's headquarters in New York City. Along the way, he has written articles for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, GQ, Time and other notable publications. Kunen is currently a teacher of English as a second language for immigrants. He and his family live in Brooklyn.

Read an Excerpt

"In 1968, when I was nineteen, I wrote a book about being nineteen and trying to change the world—or at least find a new way to live in it. It was called The Strawberry Statement, and it gave voice to what a lot of people my age were hoping: that our generation would be different. We wouldn't care so much about careers, status, and material things. We'd be less greedy, more kind, less alienated, more true to ourselves. . . . Now I find myself at this place called Too Young to Retire and Too Old to Hire, and there's a huge crowd here, a regular Woodstock, with more arriving all the time. Many of us grudgingly made a deal to sell our time on Earth to the Corporation, only to be informed abrubtly that the Corporation would no longer be buying. How did that happen?" —From the Introduction

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