A Drinking Life

A Drinking Life

Audio CD

$123.75 View All Available Formats & Editions
MARKETPLACE
1 New & Used Starting at $59.95

Overview

A journalist and author of Loving Women recreates the hard-drinking Brooklyn-Irish lifestyle that informed every aspect of his childhood and early career and that eventually destroyed his marriage.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781402575914
Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date: 05/03/2011
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.50(h) x 5.00(d)

About the Author

Hometown:

New York, New York, and Cuernavaca, Mexico

Date of Birth:

1935

Place of Birth:

Brooklyn, New York

Education:

Mexico City College, 1956-1957; Pratt Institute

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Drinking Life 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
klavierfrau More than 1 year ago
Really didn't think I would get into this book, but the writing is so superb I couldn't put it down. Unfortunately, for some reason the ebook I downloaded from B&N is fraught with typos.
kilty More than 1 year ago
A poignant recollection, and one I was extremely comfortable slipping into since I had the good fortune to grow up in New York City during that time period. I rediscovered forgotten memories of people, places and incidents and enjoyed revisiting them from an older (and hopefully, wiser) perspective. Thank you, Mr. Hamill, for a gem of a book.
Lou_Marais More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed Pete Hamill's memoir as I would a gripping novel. He has gone all the way back to young boyhood, honestly and with perfected craft re-creating boyhood and young adulthood. It's not only "A Drinking Life", it's a comic book-devouring and replicating life, a working life, a life of the Irish first generation in mid 20th century New York. Hamill's early draw to art, Greenwich Village, learning (mostly auto-didactic) and hard work seem to lead inexorably to his career as a writer.
dickmanikowski on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not what I'd expected when I first sought it out, this memoir traces a journalist's life from his childhood to the point where he successfully gives up alcohol because he recognizes all the problems it's brought into his own life and those of the people around him. I had expected a tale of many relapses before final long-term sobriety, but the process of quitting drinking occupies a remarkably small portion of this book.But it's still a worthwhile read to learn how Hamill came out of very humble tenement roots to become a celebrated columnist and screenwriter.
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A Drinking Life is an odyssey. It is an autobiographical examination of alcoholism where the drinking escalates slowly, sip by sip, drink by drink. For me, it dragged on in places. Hamill spends two thirds of the book setting the stage for his lead performance as an alcoholic. Starting with Hamill's early childhood in the early 1940s he recounts his formative years living with his Irish parents in Brooklyn, New York. His father's own battle with the bottle is omnipresent, a constant in Hamill's life. That lays the groundwork for the excuses Hamill will make and his ultimate drinking downfall. Bars and beer are in the background as Hamill describes other obsessions in his life: comics as a child, newspapers, art and fighting as a teen, sex throughout the ages, and later as an adult, traveling, politics and writing. Alcohol is the one constant through it all.
karieh on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up out of desperation for something, anything to read¿and I must admit that the title clinched the deal. ¿A Drinking Life¿ ¿ I couldn¿t resist. Drama, angst, highs, lows¿it¿s all right there in the title.What I wasn¿t expecting was a book that depicts a time, place and way of life that has always fascinated me. One of the reasons I love ¿A Tree Grows in Brooklyn¿ is the vivid and at the same time, faded sepia description of a New York, and an America that I never knew. I¿ve been to New York twice, have seen touristy parts and not so touristy parts, have been at turns delighted and appalled by its residents¿and of course, in that short period of time, barely scratched the surface of this city that almost defies description. Because, of course, there are so many facets to it. New York depends on the area, the time, the circumstances. One person¿s New York may be a polar opposite of the next person¿s.Pete Hamill, in the first half of his memoir, describes the New York of Brooklyn from 1939 to 1950. In this New York, he and his Irish Catholic family struggle to better their situation. They live hand to mouth, in sometimes squalid apartments ¿ too small for a family that keeps growing. And yet ¿ when Hamill spends pages describing the more positive aspects of his childhood ¿ I feel a yearning to be there. To see the far quieter and yet more greatly populated streets. I hope to hear the sounds of stickball, and radios playing jazz and swing into a summer night. I want to feel the safety and connection of a neighborhood that knows each and every member¿one that shares the joy of the end of a war that they together shared the dread of.He describes D day in a New York that had been blacked out for months fearing air raids. ¿¿without warning, the entire skyline of New York erupted into glorious light: dazzling, glittering, throbbing in triumph. And the crowds on the rooftops roared. They were roaring on roofs all over Brooklyn, on streets, on bridges, the whole city roaring for light. There it was, gigantic and brilliant, the way they said it used to be: the skyline of New York. Back again. On D day, at the command of Mayor LaGuardia. And it wasn¿t just the skyline. Over on the left was the Statue of Liberty, glowing green from dozens of light beams, a bright red torch held high over her head. The skyline and the statue: in all those years of the war, in all those years of my life, I had never seen either of them at night. I stood there in the roar, transfixed.¿He also describes his love of books, and words, and comics and the magic that happens when one is drawn into the new world of a story. When you discover a world, an existence, a universe previously unknown. ¿But when we lived on Thirteenth Street, the content of the comics was driving deep into me. They filled me with secret and lurid narratives, a notion of the hero, a sense of the existence of evil. They showed me the uses of the mask, insisting that heroism was possible only when you fashioned an elaborate disguise. Most important was the lesson of the magic potion. The comics taught me, and millions of other kids, that even the weakest human being could take a drink and be magically transformed into someone smarter, bigger, braver. All you needed was the right drink.¿And there it is, of course. The underlying thread of the book¿drinking. From the earliest age, alcohol is everywhere in Hamill¿s life. In his neighborhood, in his home, even in his history ¿ drinking is an accompaniment to all events, large and small.When he reads Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the passage that stands out is one where Jekyll drinks the potion and is transformed in a hideous way¿¿I read that passage and thought of my father.¿ Hamill is deeply influenced by his father¿hating what drinking does to him at the same time he is learning that drinking is what men do.As the book continues, some of the detail of Hamill¿s life is lost, certainly because (as
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What storytelling. Never read anything else by Hamill, but have heard his name all my life. This book is what I consider to be great.
Lynn024 More than 1 year ago
I read this book  when it first came out in paperback and I absolutely loved it. I could not put it down, this is a book that really really stuck with me and I have loved Pete Hamill's writing ever since. I re-read it again recently and I still love it. It makes you laugh and cry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While this book has many interesting stories, there is no real plot and it pretty much goes nowhere
lorac55 More than 1 year ago
A truly remarkable book. Read it through twice!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago