Edge

Edge

by Jeffery Deaver

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Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of The Burial Hour delivers a thriller featuring his signature ticking-clock suspense, sharp plot twists, and whip-smart dialogue.

Behind the well-known U.S. security organizations—the FBI and CIA among them—lies a heavily guarded, anonymous government agency dedicated to intelligence surveillance and to a highly specialized brand of citizen protection.

Shock waves of alarm ripple through the clandestine agency when Washington, D.C., police detective Ryan Kessler inexplicably becomes the target of Henry Loving, a seasoned, ruthless “lifter” hired to obtain information using whatever means necessary. While Loving is deft at torture, his expertise lies in getting an “edge” on his victim—leverage—usually by kidnapping or threatening family until the “primary” caves under pressure.

The job of keeping the Kessler family alive falls to a man named Corte, a senior federal protection officer known as a “shepherd.” Uncompromising, relentlessly devoted to protecting those in his care and a passionate board game aficionado, he applies brilliant gaming strategy to his work. For Corte, the reappearance of Loving—the man who, six years earlier, had tortured and killed someone close to him—is also an opportunity to avenge his friend’s death. The assignment soon escalates into a fast-paced duel between Corte and Loving, a dangerous volley of wits and calculated risks.

As he shepherds the Kesslers to a concealed safe house, Corte must anticipate Loving’s every step as the lifter moves in on his prey, and with the help of razor-sharp investigator Claire DuBois and his longtime ally, FBI agent Paul Fredericks, pinpoint which of Kessler’s seemingly insignificant cases has triggered Loving’s return. As the team digs deeper, each of the Kesslers comes under close scrutiny, and in captivity their family bonds are stretched to the breaking point—as the lifter draws near, Corte must ultimately choose between protecting his charges and exposing them to a killer in the name of long-awaited revenge.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781439158975
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 11/02/2010
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 111,418
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Jeffery Deaver is the #1 international bestselling author of more than forty novels, three collections of short stories, and a nonfiction law book. His books are sold in 150 countries and translated into 25 languages. His first novel featuring Lincoln Rhyme, The Bone Collector, was made into a major motion picture starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie, which is currently being adapted for television by NBC. 

He's received or been shortlisted for a number of awards around the world, including Novel of the Year by the International Thriller Writers and the Steel Dagger from the Crime Writers' Association in the United Kingdom. In 2014, he was the recipient of three lifetime achievement awards. A former journalist, folksinger, and attorney, he was born outside of Chicago and has a bachelor of journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a law degree from Fordham University.

Hometown:

Washington, D.C.

Date of Birth:

May 6, 1950

Place of Birth:

Chicago, Illinois

Education:

B.A., University of Missouri; Juris Doctor, cum laude, Fordham University School of Law

Read an Excerpt


Chapter 1

“WE’VE GOT A bad one, Corte.”

“Go ahead,” I said into the stalk microphone. I was at my desk, on a hands-free. I set down the old handwritten note I’d been reading.

“The principal and his family’re in Fairfax. There’s a go-ahead order for a lifter and seems like he’s under some time pressure.”

“How much?”

“A couple of days.”

“You know who hired him?”

“That’s a negative, son.”

It was Saturday, early. In this business, we drew odd hours and workweeks of varying lengths. Mine had just begun a couple of days ago and I’d finished a small job late yesterday afternoon. I was to have spent the day tidying up paperwork, something I enjoy, but in my organization we’re on call constantly.

“Keep going, Freddy.” There’d been something about his tone. Ten years of working with somebody, even sporadically, in this line of work gives you clues.

The FBI agent, never known for hesitating, now hesitated. Finally: “Okay, Corte, the thing is ?? ?”

“What?”

“The lifter’s Henry Loving?? . I know, I know. But it’s confirmed.”

After a moment, in which the only sounds I could hear were my heart and a whisper of blood through my ears, I responded automatically, though pointlessly, “He’s dead. Rhode Island.”

Was dead. Was reported dead.”

I glanced at trees outside my window, stirring in the faint September breeze, then looked over my desk. It was neat but small and cheaply made. On it were several pieces of paper, each demanding more or less of my attention, as well as a small carton that FedEx had delivered to the town house, only a few blocks from my office, that morning. It was an eBay purchase I’d been looking forward to receiving. I’d planned to examine the contents of the box on my lunch hour today. I now slid it aside.

“Go on.”

“In Providence? Somebody else was in the building.” Freddy filled in this missing puzzle piece, though I’d almost instantly deduced—correctly, from the agent’s account—exactly what had happened. Two years ago the warehouse Henry Loving had been hiding in, after fleeing a trap I’d set for him, had burned to the ground. The forensic people had a clear DNA match on the body inside. Even badly burned, a corpse will leave about ten million samples of that pesky deoxyribonucleic acid. Which you can’t hide or destroy so it doesn’t make sense to try.

But what you can do is, afterward, get to the DNA lab technicians and force them to lie—to certify that the body was yours.

Loving was the sort who would have anticipated my trap. Before he went after my principals, he’d have a backup plan devised: kidnapping a homeless man or a runaway and stashing him in the warehouse, just in case he needed to escape. This was a clever idea, threatening a lab tech, and not so far-fetched when you considered that Henry Loving’s unique art was manipulating people to do things they didn’t want to do.

So, suddenly, a man a lot of other people had been content—I’d go so far as to use the word “happy”—to see die in a fire was now very much alive.

A shadow in my doorway. It was Aaron Ellis, the head of our organization, the man I reported to directly. Blond and fiercely broad of shoulder. His thin lips parted. He didn’t know I was on the phone. “You hear? Rhode Island—it wasn’t Loving after all.”

“I’m on with Freddy now.” Gesturing toward the hands-free.

“My office in ten?”

“Sure.”

He vanished on deft feet encased in brown tasseled loafers, which clashed with his light blue slacks.

I said to the FBI agent, in his office about ten miles from mine, “That was Aaron.”

“I know,” Freddy replied. “My boss briefed your boss. I’m briefing you. We’ll be working it together, son. Call me when you can.”

“Wait,” I said. “The principals, in Fairfax? You send any agents to babysit?”

“Not yet. This just happened.”

“Get somebody there now.”

“Apparently Loving’s nowhere near yet.”

“Do it anyway.”

“Well—”

“Do it anyway.”

“Your wish, et cetera, et cetera.”

Freddy disconnected before I could say anything more.

Henry Loving

I sat for a moment and again looked out the window of my organization’s unmarked headquarters in Old Town Alexandria, the building aggressively ugly, 1970s ugly. I stared at a wedge of grass, an antique store, a Starbucks and a few bushes in a parking strip. The bushes lined up in a staggered fashion toward the Masonic Temple, like they’d been planted by a Dan Brown character sending a message via landscaping rather than an email.

My eyes returned to the FedEx box and the documents on my desk.

One stapled stack of papers was a lease for a safe house near Silver Spring, Maryland. I’d have to negotiate the rent down, assuming a cover identity to do so.

One document was a release order for the principal I’d successfully delivered yesterday to two solemn men, in equally solemn suits, whose offices were in Langley, Virginia. I signed the order and put it into my OUT box.

The last slip of paper, which I’d been reading when Freddy called, I’d brought with me without intending to. In the town house last night I’d located a board game whose instructions I’d wanted to reread and had opened the box to find this sheet—an old to-do list for a holiday party, with names of guests to call, groceries and decorations to buy. I’d absently tucked the yellowing document into my pocket and discovered it this morning. The party had been years ago. It was the last thing I wanted to be reminded of at the moment.

I looked at the handwriting on the faded rectangle and fed it into my burn box, which turned it into confetti.

I placed the FedEx box into the safe behind my desk—nothing fancy, no eye scans, just a clicking combination lock—and rose. I tugged on a dark suit jacket over my white shirt, which was what I usually wore in the office, even when working weekends. I stepped out of my office, turning left toward my boss’s, and walked along the lengthy corridor’s gray carpet, striped with sunlight, falling pale through the mirrored, bullet-resistant windows. My mind was no longer on real estate values in Maryland or delivery service packages or unwanted reminders from the past, but focused exclusively on the reappearance of Henry Loving—the man who, six years earlier, had tortured and murdered my mentor and close friend, Abe Fallow, in a gulley beside a North Carolina cotton field, as I’d listened to his cries through his still-connected phone.

Seven minutes of screams until the merciful gunshot, delivered not mercifully at all, but as a simple matter of professional efficiency.

© 2010 Jeffery Deaver

Chapter 1

“WE’VE GOT A bad one, Corte.”

“Go ahead,” I said into the stalk microphone. I was at my desk, on a hands-free. I set down the old handwritten note I’d been reading.

“The principal and his family’re in Fairfax. There’s a go-ahead order for a lifter and seems like he’s under some time pressure.”

“How much?”

“A couple of days.”

“You know who hired him?”

“That’s a negative, son.”

It was Saturday, early. In this business, we drew odd hours and workweeks of varying lengths. Mine had just begun a couple of days ago and I’d finished a small job late yesterday afternoon. I was to have spent the day tidying up paperwork, something I enjoy, but in my organization we’re on call constantly.

“Keep going, Freddy.” There’d been something about his tone. Ten years of working with somebody, even sporadically, in this line of work gives you clues.

The FBI agent, never known for hesitating, now hesitated. Finally: “Okay, Corte, the thing is ?? ?”

“What?”

“The lifter’s Henry Loving?? . I know, I know. But it’s confirmed.”

After a moment, in which the only sounds I could hear were my heart and a whisper of blood through my ears, I responded automatically, though pointlessly, “He’s dead. Rhode Island.”

Was dead. Was reported dead.”

I glanced at trees outside my window, stirring in the faint September breeze, then looked over my desk. It was neat but small and cheaply made. On it were several pieces of paper, each demanding more or less of my attention, as well as a small carton that FedEx had delivered to the town house, only a few blocks from my office, that morning. It was an eBay purchase I’d been looking forward to receiving. I’d planned to examine the contents of the box on my lunch hour today. I now slid it aside.

“Go on.”

“In Providence? Somebody else was in the building.” Freddy filled in this missing puzzle piece, though I’d almost instantly deduced—correctly, from the agent’s account—exactly what had happened. Two years ago the warehouse Henry Loving had been hiding in, after fleeing a trap I’d set for him, had burned to the ground. The forensic people had a clear DNA match on the body inside. Even badly burned, a corpse will leave about ten million samples of that pesky deoxyribonucleic acid. Which you can’t hide or destroy so it doesn’t make sense to try.

But what you can do is, afterward, get to the DNA lab technicians and force them to lie—to certify that the body was yours.

Loving was the sort who would have anticipated my trap. Before he went after my principals, he’d have a backup plan devised: kidnapping a homeless man or a runaway and stashing him in the warehouse, just in case he needed to escape. This was a clever idea, threatening a lab tech, and not so far-fetched when you considered that Henry Loving’s unique art was manipulating people to do things they didn’t want to do.

So, suddenly, a man a lot of other people had been content—I’d go so far as to use the word “happy”—to see die in a fire was now very much alive.

A shadow in my doorway. It was Aaron Ellis, the head of our organization, the man I reported to directly. Blond and fiercely broad of shoulder. His thin lips parted. He didn’t know I was on the phone. “You hear? Rhode Island—it wasn’t Loving after all.”

“I’m on with Freddy now.” Gesturing toward the hands-free.

“My office in ten?”

“Sure.”

He vanished on deft feet encased in brown tasseled loafers, which clashed with his light blue slacks.

I said to the FBI agent, in his office about ten miles from mine, “That was Aaron.”

“I know,” Freddy replied. “My boss briefed your boss. I’m briefing you. We’ll be working it together, son. Call me when you can.”

“Wait,” I said. “The principals, in Fairfax? You send any agents to babysit?”

“Not yet. This just happened.”

“Get somebody there now.”

“Apparently Loving’s nowhere near yet.”

“Do it anyway.”

“Well—”

“Do it anyway.”

“Your wish, et cetera, et cetera.”

Freddy disconnected before I could say anything more.

Henry Loving

I sat for a moment and again looked out the window of my organization’s unmarked headquarters in Old Town Alexandria, the building aggressively ugly, 1970s ugly. I stared at a wedge of grass, an antique store, a Starbucks and a few bushes in a parking strip. The bushes lined up in a staggered fashion toward the Masonic Temple, like they’d been planted by a Dan Brown character sending a message via landscaping rather than an email.

My eyes returned to the FedEx box and the documents on my desk.

One stapled stack of papers was a lease for a safe house near Silver Spring, Maryland. I’d have to negotiate the rent down, assuming a cover identity to do so.

One document was a release order for the principal I’d successfully delivered yesterday to two solemn men, in equally solemn suits, whose offices were in Langley, Virginia. I signed the order and put it into my OUT box.

The last slip of paper, which I’d been reading when Freddy called, I’d brought with me without intending to. In the town house last night I’d located a board game whose instructions I’d wanted to reread and had opened the box to find this sheet—an old to-do list for a holiday party, with names of guests to call, groceries and decorations to buy. I’d absently tucked the yellowing document into my pocket and discovered it this morning. The party had been years ago. It was the last thing I wanted to be reminded of at the moment.

I looked at the handwriting on the faded rectangle and fed it into my burn box, which turned it into confetti.

I placed the FedEx box into the safe behind my desk—nothing fancy, no eye scans, just a clicking combination lock—and rose. I tugged on a dark suit jacket over my white shirt, which was what I usually wore in the office, even when working weekends. I stepped out of my office, turning left toward my boss’s, and walked along the lengthy corridor’s gray carpet, striped with sunlight, falling pale through the mirrored, bullet-resistant windows. My mind was no longer on real estate values in Maryland or delivery service packages or unwanted reminders from the past, but focused exclusively on the reappearance of Henry Loving—the man who, six years earlier, had tortured and murdered my mentor and close friend, Abe Fallow, in a gulley beside a North Carolina cotton field, as I’d listened to his cries through his still-connected phone.

Seven minutes of screams until the merciful gunshot, delivered not mercifully at all, but as a simple matter of professional efficiency.

© 2010 Jeffery Deaver

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“[A] brain teaser of a thriller . . . Following the moves of Deaver’s ingenious plot is hard enough. The real trick is keeping up with his brilliant mind.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Along with a complex investigation and a dangerous cat-and-mouse game, Edge also boasts some high-stakes political drama . . . Swiftness and ruthlessness carry the book's momentum, keeping readers on the . . . well, check the title again. . . . Rumors are that Edge might kick off a new series for Deaver [and] Corte's combination of professionalism and duplicity offer the chance for conflicts, both internal and external, to deepen. In the meantime, Deaver has been commissioned to write the next James Bond novel—a golden opportunity he's clearly earned.”—The Washington Post

“[A] twist-filled thriller . . . In Mr. Deaver's kaleidoscope world, the odds seem to change with each turn of the page.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Jeffery Deaver is one of the most reliable and prolific writers of mysteries and thrillers. . . . And some of his books are among the best thrillers written. The Bone Collector and The Coffin Dancer are brilliant, involving and creepy to the max. The Vanished Man is brilliant although less creepy, kind of a tribute to thriller-writing, in a way. Those three are all Lincoln Rhyme mysteries—his quadriplegic forensics investigator is one of the most popular characters in mystery fiction ever created, and certainly one of the best among living writers. Deaver's latest, Edge, is not a Rhyme mystery, but it's still one of Deaver's best, a book that grabs readers on its first page and doesn't let go.”—San Jose Mercury News

“The action is a cat-and-mouse weave of clues and counter-clues. . . . This is vintage Deaver at his best.”—Toronto Globe and Mail

“Another Deaver winner.”—The Toronto Sun

“Completely and utterly thrilling. . . . Deaver has created a story where nothing is as it seems. The only thing you can be sure of is that it will keep you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.”—Sunday Times (South Africa)

"Anyone who doubts the Ian Fleming estate's choice of perennial chart-topper Jeffery Deaver to pen the next James Bond novel need only savour his latest standalone barnburner, Edge. . . . A master of brilliantly paced misdirection, Deaver could teach a post-grad course in thriller writing."—The Winnipeg Free Press

“Deaver unveils some nifty new tricks in this edge-of-your-seat thriller . . . Deaver’s first first-person narrator, Corte, is an exciting new weapon in the author’s arsenal of memorable characters.”—Publishers Weekly

“Fans of Deaver’s fiendishly clever suspensers (The Burning Wire, 2010, etc.) won’t be surprised by the nonstop deceptions, reversals, shocks and surprises, but this time they’re even more varied than usual, and, given the characters’ backgrounds, a lot more plausible. The result is his most successful thriller in years.”—Kirkus reviews

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Edge 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 178 reviews.
scott hamilton More than 1 year ago
Overall a fun, intetesting, and original book. It's a good way to spend time; sufficiently engaging and unique that it draws you in. Some well-drawn characters, though it seems as if some development was held back in anticipation of a series. Exciting without losing credibility; feels more organic than formulaic.
Nstitches More than 1 year ago
A huge disappointment. I normally at least like Deaver novels, but this one was not only unbelievable in its plots and characters, it became more and more unbelievable until its ridiculous conclusion. I found myself saying aloud (and with disgust) at each plot twist, "oh, PLEASE!" The characters could be said to be one dimensional if they had a dimension, but they don't. The characters do not draw our emotions, unless boredom is an emotion. Too bad the publishers don't can bad books by good authors.
Tigerpaw70 More than 1 year ago
This action packed, fast paced, heart-pounding brain-teaser pits two ruthless professionals against each other in a cat and mouse game. The suspense generated plays nifty tricks on your mind and every time someone new wanders across the page the atmosphere builds. The storyline is narrated in the first person and has great plotting and a wonderful cast of characters. One of the main characters is a ¿shepherd¿ named Corte who is charged with protecting a principal named Ryan Kessler from a ¿lifter¿ named Henry Loving. (A shepherd is the person in charge of protecting another person (the principal) and the lifter is the person employed to interrogate and extract information from the principal by deadly force or using a family member or friends as leverage. It is challenging at first, there are a lot of acronyms and terms for us to get our heads around but once we get into the swing of things, we are adeptly provided with all the twists and counter-twists to keep us constantly on our toes, we never know what is coming next. The task our hero, Corte, faces is not easy. We learn the Kessler family is a family with many problems and Ryan is no exception, he is cop with a drinking problem and a complex. Corte is faced by an ever-increasing number of distractions, complications in a deadly game as he and his opponent Henry Loving jostle for position from chapter to chapter. This intellectual and psychological thriller gripped my attention from the very beginning and never let go. Corte, a board game aficionado and Loving a very capable nemesis each trying to outwit the other in a real-life game of chess using people as pawns proved to be intriguing, captivating and quite fulfilling from start to finish. It was my first experience reading this author and it will not be the last.
fyrguy6 More than 1 year ago
Every Deaver book is a winner.
BeckyinDallas More than 1 year ago
I agree with the others who were disappointed in this book. I have read every book by Jeffery Deaver and looked forward to this one but it was a hard one to get through. I had to force myself to finish this book. Very disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved+all+the+tie-ins+with+board+game+strategies%21+
susanamper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As other reviewers have suggested, the protagonist seems to be a stand in for the author, And if this is the case, the author must be, as the protagonist is, a total bore.He wants to provide little grammar lessons along the way. Only problem, Deaver can't come close to Strunk & White or Eats, Shoots & Leaves. He begins on p. 18 by giving the grammar once over to an email. "Grammar, spelling and punctuation are good," he says. "Proper use of "per." , , , I didn't explain that 'as per,' what most people says, is redundant. . . . And matching commas around the appositive, after 'details, which you hardly ever see." Is this guy kidding. He is not going to explain "as per" by explaining it, and in fact commas around appositives are readily found in work other than Deaver's own. He can't even use grammar properly. On p.g 78 he describes "Barbara, a single mother of 50." Barbara must be really something to have birthed 50 children. Enough with the patronizing and condesending attitude Deaver; stick to what you know. I am hard pressed to say what that might be, but I can positively say it is not grammar or for that matter writing compelling fiction.
cmeilink on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Once again Jeffery Deaver has crafted the perfect thriller. As we follow a protection officer, also referred to as a "shepherd", named Corte on his assignment to protect a police officer and his family, we, like Corte, attempt to pull together all of the clues to determine the identity of the threat.As Corte engages in a strategic battle against Loving, the "lifter" hired to extract information from one of the family members on behalf of his mystery client, we methodically try to determine the family member at risk and stop Loving before it's too late.Nothing is obvious, and just when you think you have it figured out...you realize you don't. Great pace and interesting characters.Recommended read!
SuseGordon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Corte is a shepherd, but is the the proverbial shepherd who guides and protects the herd or is he more like the sheep dog, not only guiding, but also going after the threat(s).. He protects the principals from hitters or lifters... Corte, the shepherd, is the step between going from your everyday life to witness protection while having the Primary (the bad guy) sending someone (a hitter or lifter) to kill or get information from you. An Edge is what you keep the other guy from gaining... an edge would be when the primary's family is taken by the hitter to cause the primary to give-up.In [Edge], Corte lives a solitary life as a Shepherd. He wants revenge on a Hitter, Henry Loving, for the murder of another shepherd whom Corte was protege to. But he also need to protect the principal(s) from an unknown Primary. The race and chase is on from safe house to safe house, with shoot-outs, car chases left and right. Add to that the detective work of Corte's protege who is trying to find out why this family has been targeted and who has sent the Hitter after them. Many surprises with some game playing strategies thrown in and an ending that you won't see coming!
bitsy08 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
To my mind, a good read. Not outstanding, but a good read. He did say one thing a couple of times that is worth repeating and relevant to today's politics. "Look at the anger out there, look at the partisanship. People seem willing to do whatever they need to for their side to win." Too much screaming in Congress. Too much screaming everywhere. This was a good "puzzle." Never would have guessed who it was in the end.
oclreviewers on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a test. I believe there is an unlimited amount of space for a review. I will test this by making use of some jibberish. I apologize in advance for the text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
kpetlewski on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This doesn't have the usual twists upon twists I have come to expect from Deaver, but I loved it anyway, especially the main character who loves to collect board games.
LisaDunckley More than 1 year ago
Henry Loving is a “lifter”--someone who specializes in getting to someone and applying ruthless techniques to extract needed information for whoever hires him. Corte, the “shepherd”, tries to protect those targets. He had a run-in with Loving in the past, when Loving tortured and killed his partner—and he and everyone else believed Loving to now be dead. Until Loving shows up, targeting a local hero cop. No one can figure out why Ryan Kessler is in Loving's crosshairs. Corte is determined to keep his people alive, to figure out what information Loving is after—and to finally GET Loving this time. Kessler and his wife are taken by Corte, while their daughter is sent to a supposed safe location. Kessler's sister-in-law accompanies them, causing all kinds of trouble in her denial of how serious this situation is. Kessler himself causes issues—you can't expect ANY cop, let alone an actual HERO, to stand idly by and let himself be hunted!! The tension builds as they keep moving to keep safe, but Loving seems to be one step ahead of them the entire time. The race to find out exactly who Loving is after, and why, keeps pace with the chase. Another excellent Jeffery Deaver thriller!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thats just nasty yall.
Wiliam_Maltese More than 1 year ago
A PAGE TURNER … FOR SURE! Here’s yet another tale of a super-secret U.S. government agency, this one charged with “shepherding” its charges to keep them safe until whomever the bad guys (out to get them) are neutralized. Our hero and “shepherd”, a senior protection officer, finds himself in charge of a Washington, D.C., police detective and the detective’s family in a cat-and-mouse game with a ruthless hired killer (a “lifter”) who has no qualms about kidnapping and torturing anyone, including kids, to achieve his final objective. I liked this book, because it was fast-paced, and it kept me guessing to the very end, offering red herrings galore in not only taking down the villain but in finding out the identity of the person or persons behind putting out the contract, as well as revealing the mysterious reasoning behind it. Each time I thought I had the person responsible figured out — I’m usually pretty good at that sort of thing — I was proved wrong. I liked that; it kept me interested and guessing. It was a unique aspect that the protagonist, besides having several university degrees, was an avid game-player, preferring game boards, and used game strategy in the deadly “game” he was playing with the antagonist, the latter often even more adept than the hero. The book’s ending satisfied by tying up all of the loose ends (some I’d even forgotten needed tying) as well as providing one final unexpected twist. Certainly, I want to read more books by this author, and, luckily, having only read his “The Bone Collector”, besides this one, I presently have about twenty-five more from which to choose. Bravo, Mr. Deaver!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a huge fan and reader of all his books,this one was a huge disappointment. Great start but rhen quickly turned boring. Started skipping all the lengthy first person narratives just to get through the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just finished this book. Excellent mind games between the good guy and the bad. Loved it!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved this book. One of the best I've read in a long time - and I read a lot of books. First book by this author that I've read - I'll definitely be reading more of his work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago