Institutes of Hindu Law: Or, the Ordinances of Manu, According to the Gloss of Culluca. Comprising the Indian System of Duties, Religious and Civil. Verbally translated from the original Sanscrit. With a Preface, By Sir William Jones (1796)

Institutes of Hindu Law: Or, the Ordinances of Manu, According to the Gloss of Culluca. Comprising the Indian System of Duties, Religious and Civil. Verbally translated from the original Sanscrit. With a Preface, By Sir William Jones (1796)

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Overview

The Manusmriti, or Laws of Manu, is an important statement of Hindu law. Attributed to Manu, the progenitor of humanity in Hindu theology, it was compiled in its final form around 200 BCE. It is a collection of laws governing individuals, communities and nations and is an important (and somewhat controversial) source of information about the caste system and the status of women.

This work achieved its international prominence through Jones [1746–1794], the able judge of the High Court of Calcutta and brilliant linguist, who produced the first complete English translation. Jones was attracted to this work because of its structural similarities to the Institutes of Justinian. Intending to establish Manu as the “Justinian of India,” he planned to follow this translation with translations of other texts that resembled other parts of the Corpus Juris Civilis. He did not live long enough to complete his great project. With a new introduction by Steve Sheppard, William Enfield Professor of Law, University of Arkansas School of Law. xvi, 366 pp.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781584777311
Publisher: Lawbook Exchange Ltd
Publication date: 09/13/2018
Pages: 408
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.06(d)

Table of Contents

Law, God, Custom, and Duties in Sir William Jones’s Ordinances of Menu:

An Introduction for the American Reader, by Stephen Sheppard

Further Reading

Preface by Sir William Jones

Chapter the First, On the Creation, with a Summary of the Contents

Chapter the Second, On Education; or on the Sacerdotal Class, and the First Order

Chapter the Third, On Marriage; or on the Second Order

Chapter the Fourth, On Economicks; and Private Morals

Chapter the Fifth, On Diet, Purification, and Women

Chapter the Sixth, On Devotion; or on the Third and Fourth Orders

Chapter the Seventh, On Government, and Publick Law; or on the Military Class

Chapter the Eighth, On Judicature; and on Law, Private and Criminal

Chapter the Ninth, On the Same; and on the Commercial and Servile Classes

Chapter the Tenth, On the Mixed Classes; and on Times of Distress

Chapter the Eleventh, On Penance and Expiation

Chapter the Twelfth, On Transmigration and the Final Beatitude

General Note [On the lack of authority of certain parts of the text as law], by Sir William Jones

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