March: Book Three

March: Book Three

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Overview

Welcome to the stunning conclusion of the award-winning and best-selling MARCH trilogy. Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, joins co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell to bring the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today's world.

By the fall of 1963, the Civil Rights Movement has penetrated deep into the American consciousness, and as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, John Lewis is guiding the tip of the spear. Through relentless direct action, SNCC continues to force the nation to confront its own blatant injustice, but for every step forward, the danger grows more intense: Jim Crow strikes back through legal tricks, intimidation, violence, and death. The only hope for lasting change is to give voice to the millions of Americans silenced by voter suppression: "One Man, One Vote."

To carry out their nonviolent revolution, Lewis and an army of young activists launch a series of innovative campaigns, including the Freedom Vote, Mississippi Freedom Summer, and an all-out battle for the soul of the Democratic Party waged live on national television.

With these new struggles come new allies, new opponents, and an unpredictable new president who might be both at once. But fractures within the movement are deepening ... even as 25-year-old John Lewis prepares to risk everything in a historic showdown high above the Alabama river, in a town called Selma.

Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Young People's Literature
#1 New York Times Bestseller
2017 Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner
2017 Michael L. Printz Award Winner
2017 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Winner
2017 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction - Winner
2017 Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children's Literature - Winner
2017 Flora Stieglitz Straus Award Winner
2017 LA Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature - Finalist
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781603094023
Publisher: IDW Publishing
Publication date: 08/02/2016
Series: March Trilogy Series , #3
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 42,761
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 13 - 16 Years

About the Author

Congressman John Lewis was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and played a key role in the struggle to end segregation. Despite more than 40 arrests, physical attacks, and serious injuries, John Lewis remained a devoted advocate of the philosophy of nonviolence. He is co-author of the first comics work to ever win the National Book Award, the #1 New York Times bestselling graphic novel memoir trilogy MARCH, written with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell. He is also the recipient of numerous awards from national and international institutions including the Lincoln Medal, the John F. Kennedy "Profile in Courage" Lifetime Achievement Award, and the NAACP Spingarn Medal, among many others. He lives in Atlanta, GA.

Andrew Aydin is creator and co-author of the #1 New York Times best-selling graphic memoir series, MARCH. Co-authored with Rep. Lewis and illustrated by Nate Powell, MARCH is the first comics work to ever win the National Book Award, and is a recipient of the Will Eisner Comics Industry Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award Special Recognition, and the Coretta Scott King Book Award Author Honor, among other honors. Aydin's other comics work includes writing the X-Files Annual 2016 (IDW), writing for the CBLDF Liberty Annual 2016 (Image), and writing an upcoming issue of Bitch Planet (Image).

Nate Powell is a New York Times best-selling graphic novelist born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1978. He began self-publishing at age 14, and graduated from School of Visual Arts in 2000. His work includes MARCHYou Don't SayAny EmpireSwallow Me WholeThe Silence Of Our FriendsThe Year Of The Beasts, and Rick Riordan's The Lost Hero. Powell is the first and only cartoonist ever to win the National Book Award. Powell has discussed his work at the United Nations, as well as on MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show and CNN.

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March: Book Three 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
JimRGill2012 5 months ago
This stirring conclusion to the trilogy truly captures the struggle and the triumph of the Civil Rights movement. The story of John Lewis in the 1960s IS the story of the movement, and his three-volume graphic memoir gives life to its history. This final volume is especially potent as it relates the events from the church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama through the series of marches from Selma to Montgomery. Lewis’ life experience, combined with the narrative skill of Andrew Aydin and the artistic talent of Nate Powell, provides the most incisive and insightful kind of history lesson—one that shows how the personal cannot be separated from the political. Highly recommended.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Inspiring.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
The March trilogy is a graphic novel series telling the story of John Lewis's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s. When March: Book Three (2016) by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell begins in September 1963 with the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. Although this novel focuses on Lewis's experiences with him as the narrator and, of course, biographical information from his own life, this story also takes a wider lens to look at the movement as a whole. Lewis is the head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) whose younger members are feeling disillusioned with the more mainstream activists who often take credit for SNCCs moves while sidelining their role. SNCC is on the verge of fracturing from within, and violence is increasing in the south as Lewis and others make plans for Freedom Vote and the Mississippi Freedom Summer. March: Book Three is a thoughtful and engrossing conclusion to a trilogy that is already being hailed as a modern classic. This final installment was the 2016 National Book Award Winner for Young People's Literature. Although it is the third part of a trilogy, most of this story makes sense on its own. Readers with a basic knowledge of the Civil Rights Movement and history of the time may have an easier go diving into this story than those without that background. Because this book is so visual, I will admit that I had a hard time identifying key characters early on which, I think, is partly from coming to this book without reading the earlier installments. Lewis and Aydin have worked together to create a narrative that focuses on Lewis's life experiences and his own changing feelings about SNCC and the movement as a whole. At the same time, the scope and breadth of the movement--the far-reaching hopes and the devastating violence--are also emphasizes both with the narrative text and with Powell's moving illustrations and dynamic panel layouts. The black and white illustrations work extremely well to highlight the injustice the Civil Rights Movement was fighting. The lack of color in the illustrations also has the interesting effect of flattening a lot of the skin tones and underscoring how similar we all are. Powell does a good job filling each panel and page with movement and action. Some of the panels are a bit frenzied but it's a deliberate choice at key moments. Having March: Book Three framed as a story told in retrospect was also a very effective choice. Readers go into this story knowing that Lewis makes it through--he survives--and also seeing immediately how far things have progressed (and how much work remains). Reading this story through a different lens with more immediacy to the narrative would have been unbearable and often devastating in the wake of the loss and danger faced by Lewis and everyone else in the Movement. I read this graphic novel near the 2016 election and it was very poignant and bittersweet to see the power of the vote in action while also realizing how much was undone in 2016 and how much still must be done. While this book functions as a larger history of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, it's also important to remember that this series is also an autobiographical text in many ways. Because of that, this story does set aside and gloss over certain moments. This selective focus is a flaw of any biographical text and it makes sense in the context of this series as the focus is clearly and deli
HollowellTheForgottenRoom More than 1 year ago
March: Book Three is a biography of civil rights activist John Lewis in graphic novel format. This third book in the series provides lessons in advocacy from not only John Lewis, but also other civil rights activists such as Bob Moses and Fannie Lou Hammer. Marches, voter registrations, sit-ins, and freedom schools are just some of the tactics. They are as important today, as they were then. Stark black and white graphic novel illustrations are appropriate. While graphic novels are often criticized for gratuitous violence, in this case the violence was real: beatings, bullets, 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, and other murders. The format is also especially helpful for attracting reluctant readers to literature, and it brings courage, resilience, and community to the attention of a new generation of young people. As the winner of a National Book Award, March: Book Three is the genre at its best.