Mujercitas (Little Women)

Mujercitas (Little Women)

by Louisa May Alcott

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Overview

Nominada por los estadounidenses como una de las 100 mejores novelas en la serie de PBS The Great American Read

Mujercitas, el clásico de Louisa May Alcott ambientado en la guerra de Secesión, fue publicado en Estados Unidos en 1868. Han pasado casi ciento cincuenta años desde entonces, pero la complicidad de las cuatro hermanas March, quienes a través de sus gestos y palabras resumen el espíritu crítico de una época, sigue siendo fuente de inspiración y disfrute para las generaciones de lectores que se asoman a las páginas de esta fascinante obra.

Elaine Showalter, catedrática de la Universidad de Princeton, está considerada una de las voces más representativas de la crítica literaria feminista. En su brillante introducción analiza en detalle las influencias de la autora, así como el impacto de Mujercitas en la obra de escritoras de la talla de Simone de Beauvoir, Joyce Carol Oates o Cinthya Ozick.

«Si fuese un chico, me escaparía contigo y lo pasaríamos en grande, pero soy una pobre chica y he de comportarme con propiedad y volver a casa.»

ENGLISH DESCRIPTION

Little Women is a novel by American author Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888), which was originally published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869. Alcott wrote the books rapidly over several months at the request of her publisher. The novel follows the lives of four sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March—detailing their passage from childhood to womanhood, and is loosely based on the author and her three sisters. Little Women was an immediate commercial and critical success, and readers demanded to know more about the characters. Alcott quickly completed a second volume, entitled Good Wives. It was also successful. The two volumes were issued in 1880 in a single work entitled Little Women. Alcott also wrote two sequels to her popular work, both of which also featured the March sisters: Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886). Although Little Women was a novel for girls, it differed notably from the current writings for children, especially girls. The novel addressed three major themes: "domesticity, work, and true love, all of them interdependent and each necessary to the achievement of its heroine's individual identity." Little Women "has been read as a romance or as a quest, or both. It has been read as a family drama that validates virtue over wealth", but also "as a means of escaping that life by women who knew its gender constraints only too well". According to Sarah Elbert, Alcott created a new form of literature, one that took elements from Romantic children's fiction and combined it with others from sentimental novels, resulting in a totally new format. Elbert argued that within Little Women can be found the first vision of the "All-American girl" and that her multiple aspects are embodied in the differing March sisters.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9788491050476
Publisher: PRH Grupo Editorial
Publication date: 01/25/2016
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 127,676
Product dimensions: 4.90(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.70(d)

About the Author

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) nació en Germantown, Pennsylvania, y tras pasar buena parte de su vida en Boston, murió en Concord, Massachusetts. La energía y la independencia que ya tenía desde su infancia la acompañaron a lo largo de toda su vida y la llevaron a aceptar distintos empleos para poder ayudar económicamente a su familia. En 1854, Alcott publicó su primer libro, Flower Fables, al que siguieron más de treinta novelas y colecciones de relatos. Pero su nombre iría siempre unido al de Mujercitas, una novela que escribió entre mayo y julio de 1868 por encargo de sus editores.

Read an Excerpt

Mujercitas / Little Women


By Louisa May Alcott

AIMS International Books

Copyright © 0001 Louisa May Alcott
All right reserved.

ISBN: 849531116X

Chapter One

Playing Pilgrims


"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,"grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

"It's so dreadful to be poor!"sighed Meg, looking down at her old dress.

"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have lots of pretty things, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injured sniff.

"We've got father and mother, and each other, anyhow,"said Beth, contentedly, from her corner.

The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at the cheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly?

"We haven't got father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never,"but each silently added it, thinking of father far away, where the fighting was.

Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas, was because it's going to be a hard winter for every one; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army. We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don't;"and Megshook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

"But I don't think the little we should spend would do any good. We've each got a dollar, and the army wouldn't be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from mother or you, but I do want to buy Undine and Sintram for myself; I've wanted it so long,'said Jo, who was a bookworm.

"I planned to spend mine in new music,"said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth-brush and kettle-holder.

"I shall get a nice box of Faber's drawing pencils; I really need them," said Amy, decidedly.

"Mother didn't say anything about our money, and she won't wish us to give up everything. Let's each buy what we want, and have a little fun; I'm sure we grub hard enough to earn it,"cried Jo, examining the heels of her
boots in a gentlemanly manner.

"I know I do, teaching those dreadful children nearly all day, when I'm longing to enjoy myself at home," began Meg, in the complaining tone again.

"You don't have half such a hard time as I do," said Jo. "How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you"e ready to fly out of the window or box her ears?"

"It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world. It makes me cross; and my hands get so stiff, I can't practise good a bit." And Beth looked at her rough hands with a sigh that any one could hear that time.

"I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy; "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice."

"If you mean libel I'd say so, and not talk about labels, as if pa was a pickle-bottle," advised Jo, laughing.

Continues...


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