Persecution and Participation in Galatians

Persecution and Participation in Galatians

by John Anthony Dunne

Paperback

$112.00
Members save with free shipping everyday! 
See details

Overview

In his letter to the Galatians, Paul writes that his Gentile audience should not illegitimately appropriate Jewish customs, especially circumcision. As a way to understand why Paul deems circumcision in this context to be so egregious, being a matter of apostasy rather than simply an adiaphoron, John Anthony Dunne argues that the themes of suffering and persecution point to the coercive nature of the conflict in Galatia. What is at stake for Paul is allegiance to the crucified Christ. Due to the realities inaugurated by the Christ-event and the implications of participating in the Messiah's death and resurrection, suffering for the sake of the cross is to be endured instead of succumbing to the compulsion to be circumcised. Suffering persecution, rather than receiving circumcision, demarcates the true people of God who are set apart in Christ for future blessing and vindication.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783161554179
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck
Publication date: 10/01/2017
Series: Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2.Reihe Series , #454
Pages: 248
Product dimensions: 6.06(w) x 9.06(h) x (d)

About the Author

John Anthony Dunne argues that, in Galatians, Paul puts forth suffering, rather than receiving circumcision, as a badge that demarcates the true people of God who are set apart in Christ for future blessing and vindication.

Table of Contents

Preface vii

List of Abbreviations xii

Chapter 1 Introduction 1

1.1 A Rationale for the Present Study 1

1.2 Thesis Statement 4

1.3 Studies on Suffering and Persecution in the Pauline Letters 21

1.3.1 Broader Studies 21

1.3.2 Studies by Letter 25

1.3.2.1 First and Second Corinthians 25

1.3.2.2 Philippians 27

1.3.2.3 First Thessalonians 28

1.3.2.4 Romans 28

1.3.3 Summary of Non-Galatians Studies 29

1.4 Studies on Suffering and Persecution in Galatians 29

1.5 The Procedure of the Present Study 40

Chapter 2 Suffering, Sons hip, and the Spirit 43

2.1 Introduction 43

2.2 A Brief Survey of Suffering and the Spirit in Galatians 44

2.3 Galatians 4.28-5.1 47

2.3.1 The Fleshly Agitators 50

2.3.1.1 Forced Circumcision (Gal. 6.12) 56

2.3.1.2 They Do Not Keep the Law (Gal. 6.13) 58

2.3.1.3 The Fear of Persecution as the Rationale 59

2.3.1.4 Summary 61

2.3.2 Identity and Inheritance 62

2.3.3 Conclusion on Galatians 4.28-5.1 69

2.4 Galatians 3.4 69

2.4.1 Interpretative and Contextual Issues 69

2.4.2 Suffering in Vain 73

2.4.3 Suffering and the Story of Abraham 77

2.4.4 Conclusion on Galatians 3.4 78

2.5 Galatians 4.6-7 78

2.5.1 The Spirit of the Crucified Son 80

2.5.2 The "Abba Cry" Elsewhere in the New Testament 81

2.5.3 The (Second) Exodus Context of the "Abba Cry" 82

2.5.4 Conclusion on Galatians 4.6-7 86

2.6 Conclusion 86

Chapter 3 Judgment and the Marks of Jesus 88

3.1 Introduction 88

3.2 Preliminary Remarks on the Cross in Galatians 89

3.2.1 A Brief Note on Paul's Theology of the Cross 89

3.2.2 The Cross and the Agitators' Message 92

3.3 Paul and God's Vindicated People in Galatians 6.11-17 93

3.3.1 Boasting in the Cross 95

3.3.2 Bearing the Marks of Jesus 100

3.3.3 Eschatological Judgment and Apostasy 110

3.3.4 The Eschatological Cruciform People 117

3.3.4.1 A New Creational People Created by the Cross 117

3.3.4.2 The Israel of God as the New Creational People 122

3.4 Conclusion 126

Chapter 4 The Servant and the Servants 128

4.1 Introduction 128

4.2 The Isaianic Servant(s) in Galatians 1-2 129

4.2.1 Ancient Species of Rhetoric and Galatians 1-2 129

4.2.2 A Note on Studies of Isaianic Influence in Galatians 1-2 132

4.2.3 A Note on a Method for Detecting Allusions/Echoes 133

4.2.4 An Examination of Isaianic Influence in Galatians 1-2 135

4.2.4.1 Jesus as the Servant of Isaiah 135

4.2.4.2 Paul as the Servant of Isaiah 136

4.2.4.2.1 Χριστου δουλοç 137

4.2.4.2.2 The Servant Called from the Womb 138

4.2.4.3 Indwelt by the Servant 144

4.2.4.4 Displaying the Servant in Galatia 149

4.2.5 The Autobiography and the Paradigmatic Paul 151

4.2.6 Conclusion on Galatians 1-2 154

4.3 The Isaianic Servant(s) in Galatians 4.12-5.1 155

4.3.1 Is Galatians 4.12-20 an Interpolation? 155

4.3.2 Galatians 4.12 as the Start of the Letter's Exhortation? 157

4.3.3 The Galatian Imitation 158

4.3.3.1 Be Like Me: The Autobiographical Portrait 160

4.3.3.2 Be Like Me: Paul's Ministry among the Galatians 161

4.3.3.3 Imitation and Reciprocity: Final Remarks 169

4.3.4 The Servants Called from the Womb of the Servant 171

4.3.5 The Servants Will Inherit 179

4.3.5.1 The Use of Isaiah 54.1 182

4.3.5.2 Allusions to Genesis in Isaiah 184

4.3.5.3 Paul's Isaianic Reading of Genesis 186

4.3.6 Conclusion on Galatians 4.12-5.1 191

4.4 Conclusion 191

Chapter 5 Conclusion 193

Bibliography 197

Index of Ancient Sources 223

Index of Authors 241

Index of Subjects 247

Customer Reviews