The Return of Tarzan

The Return of Tarzan

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

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Overview

This edition of The Return of Tarzan i by Edgar Rice Burroughs is given by Ashed Phoenix - Million Book Edition

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781605202921
Publisher: Cosimo
Publication date: 04/12/2010
Pages: 248
Sales rank: 384,857
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.56(d)

About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875 - 1950) was an American writer best known for his creations of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, although he produced works in many genres. Burroughs was in his late 60s and was in Honolulu at the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Despite his age, he applied for and received permission to become a war correspondent, becoming one of the oldest U.S. war correspondents during World War II. This period of his life is mentioned in William Brinkley's bestselling novel Don't Go Near the Water.

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The Return of Tarzan: Tarzan Series, Book 2 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When I reached the end of Tarzan of the Apes I was surprised, and relieved, to find that it was only the first in a series. The second book, The Return of Tarzan, delivers the same action and adventure while leaving the reader with a much more satisfied feeling at the novel's conclusion. While there are many books that follow this sequel, one only needs to read the first two books to experience the thrill, and the happy ending, that a story about a man raised by apes and thrust into civilization promises. Burroughs work contains the imagination, energy, and romance that defines truly great literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oh the glory that is Edgar Rice Burroughs. He's vocabulary and imagination is absolutely flawless. I must admit that I have a deep compassion for semi-gruesome and action packed books that really keep you eager for more. Action, romance, twists and turns, friendship, betrayal, what doesn't this book have? Edgar Rice Burroughs never ceases to amaze. I would highly recommend this book to everyone, both male and female. If you have a love for long descriptive words like I do, this book is definitely for you. I love how he compares life with savage men and anthropoids to society today, and how truly wicked and corrupt we are today compared to that of our ancestors. Tarzan's personality always inspires me, and often surprises me. I often think, "I don't think I could ever do that" while reading this book. I still think Jayne is an idiot, but I believe that Rokoff is an even bigger one. He truly shows how corrupt our society is today, yet he's the man that kept this book interesting. I especially love all the different cultures displayed in this book. Arabs, savage African tribes, ancient and forgotten societies, what else do you need? It seems that everywhere Tarzan goes, trouble follows. Yet it also seems that everywhere he goes, there's a girl falling head over heels for him (but seriously, what girl wouldn't?). It is definitely a thrilling, stimulating, and original book. What man in his right mind would compose a book of a man of high class parents being raised by anthropoids during the early 1900s?! But I highly recommend this book to all of you action lovers.
dae More than 1 year ago
So much better than you think is going to be.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the book, The Return of Tarzan, Edgar Rice Burroughs narrates the second series of journeys in Tarzan¿s life from where he left off in his first book, Tarzan of the Apes. Burroughs tells of Tarzan¿s decision not to claim his title and estates from his cousin, how he travels to Paris and joins their secret service after almost having an affair with the countess. Then, he is thrown overboard a cruise liner, ending up back in his native African jungle searching for the lost treasure of Opar. To finish it all off, his almost-fiancée Jane is only miles away suffering the harsh effects of stranded life in the merciless jungle. I would recommend this book to people who enjoy pulp fiction (not the movie!) and realistic fiction as well. I really enjoyed this book because the author created Tarzan as a strong character (both mentally and physically) that I could relate to. This book keeps you on the edge of your seat continuously because the question always remains - will Tarzan¿s story have a happy ending?
WitchyWriter 9 months ago
It was fairly surprising to me, when I read Tarzan of the Apes for the first time, that Tarzan doesn’t pair up with Jane by the end of the book. Tarzan and Jane are just…always together, in all the adaptations and re-tellings. Edgar Rice Burroughs, however, keeps his readers guessing, and takes two books to get there instead of one Disney movie. This book deals with the lost city of Opar, and countless adventures and exploits of Tarzan. He’s still a free man, unfettered and unmoored, traveling here and there with friends, getting set upon by thugs and shady characters jealous of his masculinity, prowess, and status as a proper gentleman. It’s true that too many of the women in these stories are attracted to Tarzan. I suppose if I was a high priestess of a lost city that didn’t really have a thriving community and lots of men to choose from, I would fall for Tarzan when I saw him, too. Okay, let’s be real. I would fall for Tarzan even if there were a hundred other guys in easy reach. It does come across a bit sexist, though, for women to fall for Tarzan at first sight. In any case, this was an excellent continuation of the Tarzan stories, and tied up some loose ends that I wanted tied. Fans of adventure stories will love this, of course, and anyone who enjoyed Tarzan of the Apes basically has to also read The Return of Tarzan. Really. You don’t want to end things at the first book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book-found the numerous typos to be irritating!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Return of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Bur­roughs is the sec­ond novel in about the Lord of the Jun­gle. As its pre­de­ces­sor, the book was first pub­lished in a pulp mag­a­zine dur­ing 1913 and only later pub­lished in book for­mat (1915). The novel starts where Tarzan of the Apes ended, the ape man is recov­er­ing from his sac­ri­fice at mar­riage to Jane Porter and goes to visit Paul d’Arnot in France. On the ship Tarzan becomes involved in the affairs of Count­ess Olga de Coude and her hus­band, Count Raoul de Coude while two peo­ple try to prey on them. The two are Niko­las Rokoff and Alexis Paul­vitch and, as it turns out, Rokoff is the Count­ess’ no-good brother. Tarzan denies the vil­lains their scheme at every turn. In return, the Count finds Tarzan a job as a spe­cial agent in Alge­ria with the min­istry of war. After some adven­tures, Tarzan sails to Cape Town and finds that Hazel Strong, Jane’s friend, is one of the pas­sen­gers. How­ever, Rokoff and Paulovitch are also there and man­age to throw him overboard. Some­how Tarzan man­ages to swim ashore to find him­self in the coastal jun­gle where he was brought up. This time Tarzan ins smarter and befriends Busuli of the Waziri tribe which adopts him. Tarzan help the vil­lagers defend them­selves against ivory raiders and they elect him to replace their chief. The Waziri tell Tarzan where they obtain their gold, a lost city inhab­ited by beast-like men. The tribe takes Tarzan to the lost city where he is cap­tured and con­demned to be sac­ri­ficed to the sun god. The priest­ess is a beau­ti­ful woman named La, she speaks the lan­guage of the apes and tell Tarzan he is on the city of Opar. Will Tarzan escape? Will Jane marry Clay­ton? Will Rokoff get away with his evil schemes? As I was read­ing The Return of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Bur­roughs sev­eral things struck out at me almost imme­di­ately: I have read this book before, Bur­roughs can­not write dia­log, uses too much coin­ci­dences but Bur­roughs can sure spin a yarn and write action The moment I read the name “Rock­off” I knew I read this story before. I did not remem­ber par­tic­u­lars and vaguely the sto­ry­line but I’m sure I read it some­where around the ten­der age of 10 – where I was already a pro­lific reader. In this regard, read­ing this book was like vis­it­ing with a long­time old fried, reliv­ing adven­tures from the com­fort of your own home. Much of the dia­log was ridicu­lous; no-one speaks or has spo­ken like that. Rock­off, and man whose as bad as they come, has the best lines (curses: “Name of a name”) and d’Arnot is not far behind. I don’t know if Bur­roughs meant that as an over the top adven­ture, or just make it kid friendly as is done these days but to my ears the dia­log sounded wooden. There are coin­ci­dences galore in this novel. Tarzan just “hap­pened” to swim to his child­hood jun­gle, just “hap­pened” to be locked in a room with access to a tun­nel. Paul d’Arnot just “hap­pened” to be in the area, just “hap­pened” to inves­ti­gate the sea­side jun­gle etc. Once of twice to get out of a bind the author wrote him­self into is fine and accept­able, but I just came up with five exam­ples off the top of my head. Seems to me Bur­roughs employs the “just hap­pened to” method way to often in such a short book. That being said, this is a fun book. The action sequences are mag­nif­i­cent and excit­ing, the story bor­ders on the ridicu­lous­ness but Bur­roughs embraces that and guides the reader with an expert hand through­out. Some­times one just needs a sim­ple story, sus­pends belief and have a grand ol’ time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of bad editing. Had to skip whole pages. But others i liked it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The books are interesting and action packed I wanna read the whole series.
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