The Riddle (Pellinor Series #2)

The Riddle (Pellinor Series #2)

by Alison Croggon

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Overview

"Maerad’s tale continues, luminous, desperate, and bold. . . . Brimming with archetypal motifs but freshly splendorous in its own right." – Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Maerad is a girl with a tragic past, but her powers grow stronger by the day. Now she and her mentor, Cadvan, hunted by both the Light and the Dark, must unravel the Riddle of the Treesong before their kingdom erupts in chaos. The quest leads Maerad over terrifying seas and glacial wilderness, until she is trapped in the icy realm of the seductive Winterking. There, Maerad must confront what she has suspected all along: that she is the greatest riddle of all.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780763652524
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication date: 12/07/2010
Series: Pellinor Series , #2
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 154,478
Lexile: 920L (what's this?)
File size: 1 MB
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Alison Croggon, an award-winning Australian poet, playwright, editor, and critic, is the author of The Books of Pellinor quartet.

Alison Croggon was born in 1962 in South Africa to English parents. When she was four, her family returned to England, and then migrated to Australia when she was seven, where she has lived ever since. She is considered a major figure in the generation of Australian poets that emerged in the 1990s, but writes in many genres, including criticism, theater, and prose. Most recently, with the publication of the acclaimed series The Books Of Pellinor, she has become known as a writer of fantasy.

She has published seven collections of poetry, and her poems have been published widely in anthologies and magazines in Australia and elsewhere. Ash, a forty-page chapbook was published by Cusp Books in Los Angeles, and a new full collection was published by Salt Publishing in 2008. Attempts At Being was short-listed for the Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize in the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and also was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in the U.S. In 2002, 2003, and 2005 she toured the U.K., where she participated in the Poetry International Festival at Royal Festival Hall in London and Soundeye International Poetry Festival in Cork.

The year 2002 saw the publication of Alison Croggon’s first fantasy novel for young adults, The Naming, which was nominated in two categories in the Aurealis Awards for Excellence in Australian Speculative Fiction in December 2002 and named one of the Notable Books of 2003 by the Children’s Book Council of Australia. Publication in the U.K. and the U.S. followed swiftly, with German editions published in 2007/08. The Naming was picked as one of the Top Ten Books for Teens in 2005 by Amazon.com. Alison Croggon maintains a writing blog on her website where readers can discover more about the Books of Pellinor’s creation and development.

Alison Croggon has written and had performed nine works for theater, including operas and plays, which have been produced at major international theater festivals in Australia. Many of her poems have been set to music by various composers, including Michael Smetanin, Christine McCombe, Margaret Legge-Wilkinson, and Andreé Greenwell.

She was the 2000 Australia Council writer in residence at Pembroke College, Cambridge University, U.K. She was poetry editor for Overland Extra (1992), Modern Writing (1992–1994) and Voices (1996) and is founding editor of the literary arts journal Masthead. She also has a passion for theater, and as well as running a respected theatre blog, Theatre Notes, she is the Melbourne theatre critic for the Australian, Australia’s only national daily newspaper.

Read an Excerpt

"I live," said Arkan with a peculiar arrogance as they walked. "And I do not die. The wind lives, the snow lives, the ice lives, the mountains live. Rick and ice have their own voices, their own lives, their own breath, their own pulse. Do you deny them that?"

"No," said Maerad, unable to conceal the sadness in her voice. "But I like flowers."

"I will make you flowers if you desire them."

"They would be flowers of ice. Beautiful, but cold. It wouldn't be the same. But thank you."

They walked in silence for a time through the endless, beautiful corridors, and despite herself Maerad found she was admiring the beauties of Arkan-da with different eyes. The design of the pillars had changed subtly, she thought; she saw flowers within them, all with six petals, but infinitely various and intricate. She was always conscious of the man pacing beside her, although she did not look at him.

"Why do you wish to please me?" she asked, breaking the silence. "You could just as easily cast me into some dark dungeon. What difference would it make to you?"

"It is better if you do not hate or fear me," said Arkan. "Song cannot be made out of hatred and fear. That is what Sharma failed to understand."

"What is needed to make Song, then?"

Arkan turned and looked her full in the face, and Maerad's heart skipped a beat. "Do you not know?" he asked.

Maerad looked down at the floor and watched her feet. She did not want to answer.

________

Customer Reviews

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Riddle (Pellinor Series #2) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 148 reviews.
Annibebe More than 1 year ago
Words cannot express the wonder of this series! The characters come alive. I never want it to end!
LadyHester More than 1 year ago
Book two continues Maerad's story but takes her down a darker road. Her powers are growing but her knowledge and experience are lacking. Her mentor and companion, Cadvan, can only guide her so far. Her journey is sad and sometimes terrifying and Maerad must travel almost to the brink of despair.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This Book was one of the best books i have ever read i think other people can have their own opinions but to any one who likes harry potter Eragon and other fantasy books like those with magic and adventure i would recommend you to read this and the naming and the crow.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although her writing style still isn't quite what I would expect (after reading some of the praising reviews on bn.com), 'The Riddle' is without a doubt much more captivating than 'The Naming'--partially because (1) they aren't moving from campsite to campsite and eating seeds, bread, and cheese for hundreds and hundreds of pages, and (2) the ongoing development of each character draws in the reader to an almost personal level. It's not one of those books that draws you away from social life from the moment you open it until the second you're forced to turn the last page, but it's definitely kept me company while I've had nothing better to do.
Aeylis More than 1 year ago
In all honesty, I find this book to be better than the first book of the series. This is the first time that I have ever been able to say that about a book-- and there are good reasons behind my statement. "The Riddle" contains just about anything you want. Adventure, a number of fights, a good story, and some hilarious moments if you pay enough attention. But by far, the best part of this book was the author's descriptions of the characters' surroundings. Your breath will be taken away by the beauty of Thorold, the sinister ravines, and the vast mountains. This author is by far the most talented I have ever read when it comes to describing the landscape and towns... The only cons of this book were Maerad's almost unhealthy fixation on her brother, her overwhelming self-pity, the fact that the book started out kind of slow, and the cliche element of 'love' that sneaks in. However, you will enjoy this book nonetheless. I highly recommend it.
wyvernfriend on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The second book in the series and honestly it didn't grab me like the first one. Maerad does grow in the book from a pouty teenager to an adult, accepting her responsibilities while growing in power. Her quest is more about finding about herself than finding the answer to the riddle and I'm sure the next book will elicit the answers to that one. It is a very obvious middle of sequence book and I did nearly abandon it half-way through but it did merit finishing.
deliriumslibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Maerad continued, through a land (and a self) rich and strange. Halfway through the book, I had to stop reading - devastated in the way that only brilliant writing and characters who suffuse your dreams can make you. But then I continued, and I await The Crow with starry-eyed eagerness to read through the night...
lwobbe on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This second book in the Pellinor Series started out rather slow, recapping so much of the first book. It seemed like a lot of wasted type. However, when Maerad and Cadvan travel toward the far north, the Winterking's actions to thwart them provide plenty of adrenaline-pumping moments. When Maerad finds herself utterly alone, her ability to procede is assisted by many she doesn't realize are there to help her, including the family of her father, and Ardina. Her threefold nature - Annaren, Pilanel, Elidhu, gives her the ability to confound her enemies and gives her insight into the foibles of both the Light and the Dark. The answer given by Inka-Reb is a puzzle, but so is Maerad. When she finally finds herself in the Ice King's palace - or is it just a mountain cave - the attraction of what she feels must be her enemy generates much confusion. But our hero learns what she can at each step, and continues with her quest to right the wrongs of the past. What she must become to escape the Winterking provides insight into yet another group willing to help. Worth the time and better than most.
platsdevil on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is was absolutly amazing! I can barely put it down and in my opinion it is a perfect sequel to The Naming. Maerad and Cadvan are characters that you come to love. I definatly recommend it.
misserin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
LOVE this series! I can't wait to read The Crow and then I'll be counting down till The Singer comes out. This is the female version of Lord of the Rings, and while it's not Tolkien, it's certainly so much better than anything else that makes that claim! The writing, the allegory, the magical world of the Bards and the quest the heroine faces... all hook you in.
connlibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The sixteen-year old Bard, Maerad of Pellinor continues her adventure in this sequel to The Naming, where after an audience with the First Bard of Annar, Maerad realizes that he was responsible for the destruction of her home. Now she finds that she, along with her mentor, Cadvan, is being hunted by both the Light and the Dark. They escape to the island of Thorold and begin their search for a way to defeat the Dark even as the followers of the Light brace for both a civil war and an invasion by the Nameless One. Maerad discovers that she must unravel the riddle of the Treesong by journeying to the far north. Before their quest even begins, Maerad and Cadvan are attacked the forces of the bewitching Winterking, the once ally of the Nameless One. After Cadvan is lost, Maerad must journey on alone to seek the help of the northern people and escape the reach of the Winterking, all while unraveling the riddle of the Treesong and the riddle of herself.This book, the second of a quartet in the Books of Pellinor, is enjoyable for both the high school student and the adult. While seeming to a little slower moving in the middle, both the beginning and end are full of interesting caricatures, exciting action, and emotional personal and reflective moments. Maps of Edil-Amaranoh and appendices add in the understanding of Croggon¿s world. However, ignore the introduction as the author¿s fictitious claim that the story is based on real ancient texts grates against the true enjoyment of the story itself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The present? It always is but it never was because if it was than it would turn into the past!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bye I love you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I sorry i thought that... it was to late her eyes were filled with tears she ran off crying to die bright res one
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He walked into the bar, saw a shipwreck on the tv, went home, turned on the lighthouse light, and killed himself. He forgot to turn on the light. He worked in a lighthouse.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow. This book was like Poof! Read it, began it, enjoyed it, ended it. Awesome ride! The really really unexpected thing was that Maerad likes the Winterking and Cadvan nearly dies. Whoo! Was scary, that part... Anyway the plot was really well and intricately weaved together, the conflict was way strong and the resolution made sense. The story was just plain terrific.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MORE RIDDLES!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fossil?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you enjoyed "The Naming" then you will certainly enjoy this sequel. A little much exposition for my taste, but I suppose that is something you notice when re-reading them back to back. This book is a story of a young woman finding who she is, overcoming her fears, and discovering self-acceptance. I thought it was well-written and enjoyable. We are finally seeing Maerad growing into herself. The bit with Cadvan killed me, but I will restrain from any more spoilers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was much better than The Naming. The plot which was previously so predictable simply blew me away with unexpected twists and events! The author really collected herself for this installment and made a lackluster beginning into a well developed story. You really get to see a darker side of Maerad as she continues her quest. Aside from a few "Oh, yeah right!" moments, I was pleased with the expansion of the characters and the world they live in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago