Teaching Migrant Children in West Germany and Europe, 1949-1992

Teaching Migrant Children in West Germany and Europe, 1949-1992

by Brittany Lehman

Hardcover(1st ed. 2019)

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Overview

This book examines the right to education for migrant children in Europe between 1949 and 1992. Using West Germany as a case study to explore European trends, the book analyzes how the Council of Europe and European Community’s ideological goals were implemented for specific national groups. The book starts with education for displaced persons and exiles in the 1950s, then compares schooling for Italian, Greek, and Turkish labor migrants, then circles back to asylum seekers and returning ethnic Germans. For each group, the state entries involved tried to balance equal education opportunities with the right to personhood, an effort which became particularly convoluted due to implicit biases. When the European Union was founded in 1993, children’s access to education depended on a complicated mix of legal status and perception of cultural compatibility. Despite claims that all children should have equal opportunities, children’s access was limited by citizenship and ethnic identity.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783319977270
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Publication date: 11/24/2018
Series: Palgrave Studies in the History of Childhood
Edition description: 1st ed. 2019
Pages: 259
Product dimensions: 5.83(w) x 8.27(h) x (d)

About the Author

Brittany Lehman is Visiting Assistant Professor at the College of Charleston, USA. She is a migration historian focused on Europe and the Middle East. Her current research project focuses on the Federal Republic of Germany’s involvement in decolonization in North Africa and the Middle East as well as the development of humanitarian organizations like Germany Amnesty International.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2. Establishing the Right to Education for Children of Refugees (1949–1955)
Chapter 3: Defining the Right to Education for European Citizens (1955–1966)
Chapter 4: Teaching National Identity to “Guest Worker Children” (1962–1971)
Chapter 5: Equal Opportunities for West German Foreign Residents (1968–1977)
Chapter 6: More of a Right to Education for German Citizens (1976–1985)
Chapter 7: The Right to Education for Asylum Seekers and Ethnic Germans (1985–1992)
Chapter 8: Conclusion.

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