The Glass Hotel

The Glass Hotel

by Emily St. John Mandel

Hardcover

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Overview

A New York Times "20 Books We're Watching For in 2020"

An Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Bustle, Buzzfeed, GoodReads, Houston Chronicle, Writer's Digest, Medium, Washington Independent Review of Books, The Millions, Boston Globe, USA Today, and Women's Day Most Anticipated Book

From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, an exhilarating novel set at the glittering intersection of two seemingly disparate events-a massive Ponzi scheme collapse and the mysterious disappearance of a woman from a ship at sea.


Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star lodging on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. On the night she meets Jonathan Alkaitis, a hooded figure scrawls a message on the lobby's glass wall: "Why don't you swallow broken glass." High above Manhattan, a greater crime is committed: Alkaitis is running an international Ponzi scheme, moving imaginary sums of money through clients' accounts. When the financial empire collapses, it obliterates countless fortunes and devastates lives. Vincent, who had been posing as Jonathan's wife, walks away into the night. Years later, a victim of the fraud is hired to investigate a strange occurrence: a woman has seemingly vanished from the deck of a container ship between ports of call.

In this captivating story of crisis and survival, Emily St. John Mandel takes readers through often hidden landscapes: campgrounds for the near-homeless, underground electronica clubs, the business of international shipping, service in luxury hotels, and life in a federal prison. Rife with unexpected beauty, The Glass Hotel is a captivating portrait of greed and guilt, love and delusion, ghosts and unintended consequences, and the infinite ways we search for meaning in our lives.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780525521143
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/24/2020
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 48
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

EMILY ST. JOHN MANDEL's four previous novels include Station Eleven, which was a finalist for a National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award and has been translated into thirty-two languages. She lives in New York City with her husband and daughter.

Read an Excerpt

1

VINCENT IN THE OCEAN
December 2018

1
Begin at the end: plummeting down the side of the ship in the storm’s wild darkness, breath gone with the shock of falling, my camera flying away through the rain—

2
Sweep me up. Words scrawled on a window when I was thirteen years old. I stepped back and let the marker drop from my hand and still I remember the exuberance of that moment, that feel- ing in my chest like light glinting on crushed glass—

3
Have I risen to the surface? The cold is annihilating, the cold is all there is—

4
A strange memory: standing by the shore at Caiette when I was thirteen years old, my brand-new video camera cool and strange in my hands, filming the waves in five-minute intervals, and as I’m filming I hear my own voice whispering, “I want to go home, I want to go home, I want to go home,” although where is home if not there?

5
Where am I? Neither in nor out of the ocean, I can’t feel the cold anymore or actually anything, I am aware of a border but I can’t tell which side I’m on, and it seems I can move between memories like walking from one room to the next—

6
“Welcome aboard,” the third mate said the first time I ever boarded the Neptune Cumberland. When I looked at him some- thing struck me, and I thought, You—

7
I am out of time—

8
I want to see my brother. I can hear him talking to me, and my memories of him are agitating. I concentrate very hard and abruptly I’m standing on a narrow street, in the dark, in the rain, in a foreign city. A man is slumped in a doorway just across from me, and I haven’t seen my brother in a decade but I know that it’s him. Paul looks up and there’s time to notice that he looks terrible, gaunt and undone, he sees me but then the street blinks out—
 

 
2

I ALWAYS COME TO YOU
1994 and 1999

1
At the end of 1999, Paul was studying finance at the University of Toronto, which should have felt like triumph but everything was wrong. When he was younger he’d assumed he’d major in musical composition, but he’d sold his keyboard during a bad period a couple years back and his mother was unwilling to entertain the idea of an impractical degree, for which after several expensive rounds of rehab he couldn’t really blame her, so he’d enrolled in finance classes on the theory that this represented a practical and impressively adultlike forward direction—Look at me, learning about markets and the movements of money!—but the one flaw in this brilliant plan was that he found the topic fatally uninteresting. The century was ending and he had some complaints.

He’d expected that at the very least he’d be able to slip into a decent social scene, but the problem with dropping out of the world is that the world moves on without you, and between the time spent on an all-consuming substance and the time spent working soul-crushing retail jobs while he tried not to think about the substance and the time spent in hospitals and rehab facilities, Paul was twenty-three years old and looked older. In the first few weeks of school he went to parties, but he’d never been good at striking up conversations with strangers, and everyone just seemed so young to him. He did poorly on the midterms, so by late October he was spending all his time either in the library—reading, struggling to take an interest in finance, trying to turn it around—or in his room, while the city grew colder around him. The room was a single, because one of the very few things he and his mother had agreed on was that it would be disastrous if Paul had a roommate and the roommate was into opioids, so he was almost always alone. The room was so small that he was claustrophobic unless he sat directly in front of the window. His interactions with other people were few and superficial. There was a dark cloud of exams on the near horizon, but studying was hopeless. He kept trying to focus on prob- ability theory and discrete-time martingales, but his thoughts kept sliding toward a piano composition that he knew he’d never finish, this very straightforward C-major situation except with little flights of destabilizing minor chords.

In early December he walked out of the library at the same time as Tim, who was in two of his classes and also preferred the last row of the lecture hall. “You doing anything tonight?” Tim asked. It was the first time anyone had asked him anything in a while.

“I was kind of hoping to find some live music somewhere.” Paul hadn’t thought of this before he said it, but it seemed like the right direction for the evening. Tim brightened a little. Their one previous conversation had been about music.

“I wanted to check out this group called Baltica,” Tim said, “but I need to study for finals. You heard of them?”

“Finals? Yeah, I’m about to go down in flames.”

“No. Baltica.” Tim was blinking in a confused way. Paul remembered something he’d noticed before, which was that Tim seemed not to understand humor. It was like talking to an anthropologist from another planet. Paul thought that this should have created some kind of opening for friendship, but he couldn’t imagine how that conversation would begin—I can’t help but notice that you’re as alienated as I am, can we compare notes?— and anyway Tim was already walking away into the dark autumn evening. Paul picked up copies of the alternative weeklies from the newspaper boxes by the cafeteria and walked back to his room, where he put on Beethoven’s Fifth for company and then scanned the listings till he found Baltica, which was scheduled for a late gig at some venue he’d never heard of down at Queen and Spadina. When had he last gone out to hear live music? Paul spiked his hair, unspiked it, changed his mind and spiked it again, tried on three shirts, and left the room before he could make any further changes, disgusted by his indecisiveness. The temperature was dropping, but there was something clarifying about the cold air, and exercise was a therapeutic recommendation that he’d been ignoring, so he decided to walk.

The club was in a basement under a goth clothing store, down a steep flight of stairs. He hung back on the sidewalk for a few minutes when he saw this, worried that perhaps it would turn out to be a goth club—everyone would laugh at his jeans and polo shirt—but the bouncer barely seemed to notice him and the crowd was only about 50 percent vampires. Baltica was a trio: one guy with a bass guitar, another guy working an array of inscrutable electronics attached to a keyboard, and a girl with an electric violin. Whatever they were doing onstage sounded less like music than like some kind of malfunctioning radio, all weird bursts of static and disconnected notes, the kind of scattered ambient electronica that Paul, as a lifelong Beethoven fanatic, absolutely did not get, but the girl was beautiful so he didn’t mind it at all, if he wasn’t enjoying the music he could at least enjoy watching her. The girl leaned into the microphone and sang, “I always come to you,” except there was an echo—the guy with the keyboard had pressed a foot pedal—so it was

I always come to you, come to you, come to you

—and it was frankly discordant, the voice with the keyboard notes and the bursts of static, but then the girl raised her violin, and this turned out to be the missing element. When she drew her bow the note was like a bridge between islands of static and Paul could hear how it all fit together, the violin and the static and the shadowy underpinning of the bass guitar; it was briefly thrilling, then the girl lowered her violin and the music fell apart into its disparate components, and Paul found himself wonder- ing once again how anyone listened to this stuff.

Later, when the band was drinking at the bar, Paul waited for a moment when the violinist wasn’t talking to anyone and swooped in.

“Excuse me,” he said, “hey, I just wanted to tell you, I love your music.”

“Thanks,” the violinist said. She smiled, but in the guarded manner of extremely beautiful girls who know what’s coming next.

“It was really fantastic,” Paul said to the bass player, in order to confound expectations and keep the girl off balance.

“Thanks, man.” The bass player beamed in a way that made Paul think he was probably stoned.

“I’m Paul, by the way.”

“Theo,” the bass player said. “That’s Charlie and Annika.”

Charlie, the keyboardist, nodded and raised his beer, while Annika watched Paul over the rim of her glass.

“Can I ask you guys kind of a weird question?” Paul wanted so badly to see Annika again. “I’m kind of new to the city, and I can’t find a place to go out dancing.”

“Just head down to Richmond Street and turn left,” Charlie said.

“No, I mean, I’ve been to a few places down there, it’s just hard to find anywhere where the music doesn’t suck, and I was wondering if you could maybe recommend . . .?”

“Oh. Yeah.” Theo downed the last of his beer. “Yeah, try System Sound.”

“But it’s a hellhole on weekends,” Charlie said.

“Yeah, dude, don’t go on the weekends. Tuesday nights are pretty good.”

“Tuesday nights are the best,” Charlie said. “Where are you from?”

“Deepest suburbia,” Paul said. “Tuesday nights at System, okay, thanks, I’ll check it out.” To Annika, he said, “Maybe I’ll see you there sometime,” and turned away fast so as not to see her disinterest, which he felt like a cold wind on his back all the way to the door.


On the Tuesday after exams—three C’s, one C−, academic probation—Paul went down to System Soundbar and danced by himself. He didn’t really like the music, but it was nice to stand in a crowd. The beats were complicated and he wasn’t sure how to dance to them so he just kind of stepped back and forth with a beer in his hand and tried not to think about anything. Wasn’t that the point of clubs? Annihilating your thoughts with alcohol and music? He’d hoped Annika would be here, but he didn’t see her or the other Baltica people in the crowd. He kept looking for them and they kept not being there, until finally he bought a little packet of bright blue pills from a girl with pink hair, because E wasn’t heroin and didn’t count, but there was something wrong with the pills, or something wrong with Paul: he bit one in half and swallowed it, just the half, didn’t feel anything so he swallowed the other half with beer, but then the room swam, he broke out in a sweat, his heart skipped, and just for a second he thought he was going to die. The girl with the pink hair had vanished. Paul found a bench against the wall.

“Hey, man, you okay? You okay?” Someone was kneeling in front of him. Some significant amount of time had passed. The crowd was gone. The lights had come up and the brightness was terrible, the brightness had transformed System into a shabby room with little pools of unidentifiable liquid shining on the dance floor. A dead-eyed older guy with multiple piercings was walking around with a garbage bag, collecting bottles and cups, and after the force of all that music the quiet was a roar, a void. The man kneeling in front of Paul was club management, in the regulation jeans/Radiohead T-shirt/blazer that club management always wore.

“Yeah, I’m okay,” Paul said. “I apologize, I think I drank too much.”

“I don’t know what you’re on, man, but it doesn’t suit you,” the management guy said. “We’re closing up, get out of here.” Paul rose unsteadily and left, remembered when he got to the street that he’d left his coat at the coat check, but they’d already locked the door behind him. He felt poisoned. Five empty cabs cruised by before the sixth finally stopped for him. The cabbie was a proselytizing teetotaler who lectured Paul about alcoholism all the way back to campus. Paul wanted desperately to be in bed so he clenched his fists and said nothing until the cab finally pulled up to the curb, when he paid—no tip—and told the cabdriver to stop fucking lecturing him and fuck off back to India.

“Listen, I want to be clear that I’m not that person any- more,” Paul told a counselor at a rehab facility in Utah, twenty years later. “I’m just trying to be honest about who I was back then.”

“I’m from Bangladesh, you racist moron,” the cabdriver said, and left Paul there on the sidewalk, where he knelt carefully and threw up. Afterward he stumbled back to the dorm building, marveling at the scale of the disaster. Against all odds he had clawed his way up into an excellent university, and here it was only December of his first year and it was already over. He was already failing, one semester in. “You must gird yourself against disappointment,” a therapist had told him once, but he couldn’t gird himself against anything, that had always been the problem.

Fast-forward two weeks, past the nonevent of the winter holidays—his mother’s therapist had advised distance from her son, taking time for herself, and giving Paul a chance to be an adult, etc., so she’d gone to Winnipeg to be with her sister for Christmas and hadn’t invited Paul; he spent Christmas Day alone in his room and called his dad for an awkward conversation in which he lied about everything, just like old times—and all the way to December 28, the nadir of that dead week between Christmas and New Year’s, when he dressed up and walked back down to System Soundbar on another Tuesday night, hair slicked back, wearing a button-down shirt that he’d purchased specially. He was wearing the jeans he’d been wearing last time he was here and didn’t remember till he got to the club that the little packet of blue pills was still in a front pocket.

Customer Reviews

The Glass Hotel (Signed Book) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
KarenfromDothan 6 days ago
A girl named Vincent. A video camera. A luxurious hotel in a remote part of Canada. A Ponzi scheme. A vessel named Neptune Cumberland. That’s just some of the parts that make up the whole of The Glass Hotel. It’s a haunting ghost story. A tragic exploration of greed, loss, and guilty consciences. It’s about possibilities, and the choices we make. I thought this was a sad story with so many shattered lives. The author’s writing is excellent and the story lines all come together nicely. Initially I had trouble accepting that Vincent was a girl, but I grew to like her unique name. Early in the book I was wondering what the cryptic acid etched messages could possibly mean, “Sweep Me Up,” and “Why don’t you eat broken glass,” but it all became clear as the story progressed. I also liked how Vincent’s grandma explained her gift of a video camera, “ . . . the lens can function as a shield between you and the world, when the world’s a little too much to bear.” All in all I thought it was a good story.
erinevelynreads 3 days ago
In 2014 I came across a book that forever changed me and introduced me to one of my favorite authors. The book was Station Eleven and the author was Emily St John Mandel. Since then, I’ve read all of Mandel’s other books, and have fallen completely in love with their gorgeous prose. And today I’m so excited to be able to give my thoughts on The Glass Hotel. The Glass Hotel follows Vincent, a bartender at the Hotel Caiette in rural Vancouver Island as she meets Jonathon Alkaitis, the owner of the hotel and a major financial services company. From there she moves to New York to be with him. Thirteen years later, Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a container ship. The Glass Hotel weaves together a brilliant story of corruption and greed, how the lives of several people intersect in a Ponzi scheme, and the reach of a single event. The Glass Hotel is hauntingly beautiful. I didn’t love it quite as much as I loved Station Eleven, but I enjoyed it for the same reasons: gorgeous prose, vivid characters, and a thoughtfully woven plot that takes place over the course of several decades. Mandel has such a deep understanding of human motivations that she pours into her characters. If you’re picking up The Glass Hotel because you enjoyed Station Eleven for the character-driven storyline, The Glass Hotel is for you. But if you loved it for the science fiction and futuristic elements, maybe pick up something else. Thank you to @knopf for gifting me with an advanced copy of The Glass Hotel! All opinions in this review are my own.
Sandy5 5 days ago
I love a great cover and I feel that this one definitely has one. This novel sounded interesting yet when I first started to read it, I was a bit confused. With alternating time periods and a variety of characters, it took a bit for me to get everything straightened around. As the story began to take shape, I soared through the pages. Meeting Jonathan, I thought he was one of those individuals who was too-big-for-his-britches (I think I’m beginning to sound like my grandmother now). He came off as being too sophisticated and suave and he was using that to his advantage. I know some people like these types of people but me, I run the other way. Anyways, Jonathan owns the Hotel Caiette which is a 5-star hotel and I thought he basically, used this hotel as bait. Jonathan, claiming to produce high results in the finance world, begins to climb up the ladder and build-up his clientele with his former bartender, Vincent on his arm. Afterall, he needs to keep up his image, when dealing with high-end clients. As Vincent places the ring on her finger, she’s ready to step into some new shoes and get out from behind the bar at Hotel Caiette. The commitments that they made to each other had me shaking my head. It made me wonder if I would do what she did, was it really worth it? I don’t know much about Ponzi schemes but Jonathan sure is a smooth operator as he works the players. He has quite a few individuals working beside him, making everything run smoothly and it made me wonder who knew what he had up his sleeve. From making drinks to wearing elegant evening gowns, Vincent’s jump in social class is quite an adjustment for her and one that I’m not sure she enjoyed every day. I enjoyed it when she was able to be herself. As I get further into the book, each page that I turned, I wonder if and when, things would go sour. I was just waiting for the ball to drop. I want to thank Knopf Books and Goodreads for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway.
gmcootie 5 days ago
The Glass Hotel tells a moving, haunted story, about people and events and choices. It takes place in the woods and in the city, on an island, on a ship, ranging from simple life with only the basics to the rarefied air of the very rich, where life is nothing like most of us know or ever will know. It’s full of fascinating characters – a (mostly) recovering opioid addict, a bartender, cook, wife, artist, hotel concierge, fraudulent investment banker and his victims - all with some little quirk, something that makes you remember them, and makes you ask yourself, “Are we all like that? Just a little bit off?” Everyone has a secret past or hasn’t quite found the happiness, satisfaction or peace they thought their choices, their luck, their wild success would bring them. But what is luck or choice or is this just the way life is? Are those really ghosts they see, or are those just the things and people and events your mind won’t let you forget, always places just at the outside of your vision, to remind you of what was, what is, and what might have been? The Glass Hotel is a melancholy tale, weaving in and out of these characters’ lives, highlighting turning points and roads not taken, leading to the now and away from the what if? A cloud cover of sadness and regret, not quite happy, hovers over everything. The story is full of lies, loss, anger, hatred, resentment, and fleeting happiness. Author Emily St. John Mandel has created an environment with a cast of characters so compelling you can’t turn away. Once you meet them you need to follow their stories, and it makes you think about your own life. Have your choices led you to where you are, or is it fate? I received an advance copy of The Glass Hotel from the publisher, Penguin Random House. All opinions are my own. Emily St. John Mandel is an excellent writer and has told an excellent story that I highly recommend.
DG_Reads 6 days ago
I received a complimentary advanced listener copy of THE GLASS HOTEL by Emily St. John for an honest review. Thank you to Libro FM, Penguin Random House Audio and Alfred A. Knopf for the chance to read and review! THE GLASS HOTEL begins with a woman disappearing off a ship into the water the details how how and why this happened are not known. From here the story jumps to Paul, a young man struggling in college who winds up running away after finding himself in a precarious position. He winds up working in a hotel with his half-sister Vincent until he is fired for writing a note on the windowed wall of the hotel “Why don’t you swallow broken glass.” This message and the menace behind it strikes a cord with many characters, though it is is not clear why Paul wrote it. Jonathan Alkaitis is a man who has made a name for himself with success in finance and he’s the owner of the elaborate hotel located on an isolated island in British Columbia. His arrival at the hotel on the same day Paul writes the note is clearly not a coincidence, though again the reasons are not clear. The story continues from here, weaving together the lives of these and other characters. I had very mixed feelings about this book in the end. I do enjoy Emily St. John’s writing and she evokes a good sense of the places and people she is writing about. This is very much a character centered narrative with just enough plot to keep it moving along and enough questions that need answers to find out how the prologue with the woman in the water came about. I think that for me there were perhaps a few too many characters to keep track of, especially for an audiobook format where you can’t easily flip back to remind yourself who someone is. It felt like a good bit of character development went into characters who ultimately weren’t central to the story, but you didn’t necessarily know that at the time. There are also a lot of shifts in time, though I found these shifts relatively easy to follow. While the narration for this one was very well done, I think this is one that I would have benefited from having a print copy as well. Overall I really enjoyed this novel and it is well worth a spot on your TBR!
whatsbetterthanbooks 6 days ago
Tragic, imaginative, and atmospheric! The Glass Hotel is an alluring, character-driven tale that immerses you into the lives of multiple strangers as their worlds quickly unravel, intersect, collide, and are ultimately ruined when a Ponzi scheme catastrophically collapses. The prose is rich and lyrical. The characters are lonely, complex, and vulnerable. And the plot told from multiple perspectives using flashbacks and alternate realities is a hauntingly sobering tale of tragedy, crime, corruption, heartbreak, manipulation, disillusionment, morality, and the true weight of a guilty conscience. Overall, The Glass Hotel is an evocative, pensive, unique page-turner with a supernatural thread that does a beautiful job of reminding us that the choices we make often have far-reaching consequences and that life rarely unfolds as we expect it to.