The Only Woman in the Room (The Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition)

The Only Woman in the Room (The Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition)

by Marie Benedict

Hardcover(Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition)

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Come discuss The Only Woman in the Room at our Barnes & Noble Book Club Night on Tuesday, February 5th at 7:00 PM! Learn more and sign up now.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781492696827
Publisher: Sourcebooks
Publication date: 01/08/2019
Edition description: Barnes & Noble Book Club Edition
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 10
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Marie Benedict is a lawyer with more than ten years' experience as a litigator at two of the country's premier law firms and for Fortune 500 companies.

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The Only Woman in the Room 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous 8 days ago
What a story! Absolutely mesmerizing, and even inspiring, historical fiction. I seriously could not put this down! Love Marie Benedict!
Ratbruce 17 hours ago
It is no wonder that B&N choose this as their February book club book. This well researched, fictionalized account of Hedy Lamarr's calculated marriage to an Austrian arms dealer, her daring escape from Austria just before Hitler invaded and her parallel lives as a one of Hollywood's most beautiful leading ladies and an inventor who spent her evenings inventing a wireless steering mechanism for torpedos. Her life as an actress and a scientist is told in this captivating historical novel. Highly recommended
PBDeb 2 days ago
The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict There are many books out now about WWII, but don’t stop reading them until you finish The Only Woman in the Room. Not just a pretty face, this biographical/historical novel of actress Hedy Kiesler will totally “wow” you! As a former famous actress in Austria, Hedy had a front row seat to many dinners with her wealthy husband Frederick (Fritz) Mandl and his guests, who included European leaders who eventually became top players in the Second World War. Hedy, the gorgeous young hostess, listened well and took notes, mental and written, on the many table discussions in their castle. Ready to use this information to help the Allies, the opportunity didn’t arise for many years to come, and in an unexpected way. Follow Hedy out of Austria to Los Angeles where stardom awaits this beautiful woman. Her chance friendship with composer/musician George Antheil creates a scientific discovery that affects every one of our lives today. Read on and do not skip the Author’s Note at the end of this book to find out how. Hedy, the only woman in the room more than once in her life, opened the door for acceptance of women’s contributions to mankind, proving that there is often more to beauty than meets the eye. My thanks to #NewGalley and #Sourcebooks for a free digital copy of this book for review.
lghiggins 4 days ago
We meet Hedy Kiesler as a young actress in Vienna, Austria, in 1933 just as munitions manufacturer Friedrich (Fritz) Mandl begins courting her. Europe is on the cusp of war, and Hitler has started his attack on Jews. Under other circumstances, Hedy’s parents might have refused permission for the courtship, but they could see the benefit of a marriage to the rich, powerful, and well connected man. Unfortunately, Mandl’s character changes after their marriage, and he becomes abusive and controlling. Hedy’s father had encouraged her as a child in studying many subjects, especially the sciences. Hedy teams her interest in science with her position as an ornament at dinner parties to listen in on the conversations of dangerous and powerful guests in the Mandl home. Later, after escaping from Fritz, she tries to use that knowledge to save lives as Hitler continues his military advances. The book is divided into two parts. The first part deals with Hedy, her marriage, and the entrance of the United States into the war. The second focuses on her two careers after her escape from Fritz: one as the famous Hedy Lamarr (her new, non-German sounding, stage name) and the other as an inventor. Her talents as an actress and her incredible beauty outweigh her potential contributions to the war effort in the eyes of the men in power at that time. In The Only Woman in the Room, Marie Benedict has created a historical novel about a very complex woman living in times that were difficult for everyone, but especially for women. It is important to remember that even though the book is well researched, Benedict is basically filling in the skeleton of a plot with details, some of which are true and others that only might have occurred. In this book Hedy is overcome with guilt over hearing Hitler’s plans but not doing anything about them. She doesn’t believe in God, but she is dogged by a fear that she has not done enough to make up for her silence and inaction. Of course, as she finds out later, as a woman there was little she could contribute that would be valued. During the last part of the book, I couldn’t help but wonder whose scales she was concerned about—her own sense of morality, public opinion, or judgement by a higher being. That was never clarified and yet it appeared to be a driving force for her. I liked this book but not as much as Benedict’s two prior books, The Other Einstein and Carnegie’s Maid. All three novels address the hidden contributions of women. All three ladies are women of talent and intellect operating under difficult circumstances. All deserve respect, but I think I can empathize more with Mileva, Einstein’s first wife, and with Clara, a lady’s maid in Andrew Carnegie’s household. Hedy was born into privilege and by virtue of her beauty moved in important social circles. Although perhaps it shouldn’t, that background erects a barrier for me. The Only Woman in the Room is a well-written and well-researched historical novel. Benedict specializes in drawing out the stories of women whose intellectual abilities have been overlooked. It will be interesting to see whose story she will discover and share in her next historical novel. I would like to extend my thanks to netgalley.com and to Sourcebooks Landmark for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.
MarisaGbooks 5 days ago
In 2 words --that match the person this novel was written about : BRILLANT AND BEAUTIFUL this novel had a strong woman as well as a strong back story. Absolutely loved it and couldn't put it down. Old Hollywood glamour and brains are what Hedy has! cant wait to discuss in book club great pick
Anonymous 6 days ago
This is a well written and researched fictionalized historical narrative of the life of Hedy Lamarr. Born Hedwig Keisler, she was a young glamorous Jewish 19 year old actress starring in a theater production in Vienna when she met Friedrich Mandl, a powerful munitions dealer known as the ‘Merchant of Death’. Mandl is obsessed with Hedy and pursues her fanatically. Her parents pressure her into a marriage with Mandl, believing the union will offer them protection in the rising anti semitic, progressively pro Nazi climate in Austria. Early on in their marriage Mandl realizes Hedy is far from being a beautiful woman with a vacuous mind. She is quite intelligent and is useful in his business transactions. Hedy becomes privy to Mandels’ shady business dealings, often with important political figures of the time such as Mussolini and Hitler. Mandl is also a violent, controlling and abusive husband. Hedy eventually escapes the marriage and emigrated to Hollywood. The book glosses over her successful Hollywood career, choosing to concentrate on her lesser known important contributions in the field of wireless communications. Hedy is determined to make a positive contribution towards Allies winning WW ll. I found it to be truly inspiring and eye opening account into the behind the scenes story of her life.
brf1948 6 days ago
The Only Woman in the Room, like her previous work, The Other Einstein, is a historical novel-based-on-fact look and the life and contributions of women in science written by Marie Benedict. The Only Woman in the Room follows the life and times of Austrian actress Hedy Kiesler, through her youthful marriage to munitions manufacturer Friedrich Mandl. Following her escape from Austria and Mandl in 1937, she fled to the USA where she began a film career as Hedy Lamarr. Hedy made important and far reaching contributions to science and held several copyrights with her associate Gilbert Adrian for technology that is still important today. She was not 'just another pretty face'. I received a free electronic copy of The Only Woman in the Room from Netgalley, Marie Benedict, and Sourcebooks Landmark in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me.
teachlz 6 days ago
Linda Zagon's review Jan 05, 2019 · edit really liked it Lindas Book Obsession Reviews “The Only Woman in the Room” by Marie Benedict Sourcebooks Landmark, January 8, 2019 Lindas Book Obsession Reviews “The Only Woman in the Room” by Marie Benedict, Sourcebooks Landmark, January 8, 2019 Marie Benedict, Author of “The Only Woman in the Room” has written an intriguing, captivating, dramatic, entertaining, suspenseful and intense novel. The Genres for this novel are Historical Fiction and Fiction. The timeline for the story is around World War Two. The story goes into the past when it pertains to the characters or events in the story. The story takes place in Austria, and in Hollywood California. The Author describes her colorful cast of characters as complex and complicated. Hedy Kiesler is a Jewish actress in Austria. Hedy is described as gorgeous and talented. The time is just before World War Two, and the political feel in Austria is tense. For her safety, her parents are convinced to let her marry a wealthy and political munitions dealer. Her husband is supposed to be a guarantee to protect her from Nazi Germany. He is friends with Benito Mussolini. Hedy and her husband get married in church. Hedy realizes that he is abusive, and as the political climate changes, she tries to escape. There are many things that Hedy hears in the house. Eventually Hedy arranges to escape, and gets to Hollywood. She becomes Hedy Lamarr. Hedy Lamarr is one of the most famous and beautiful actresses, but liked to experiment with scientific projects. Some of her ideas were brought to the attention of the United States Navy. They were initially dismissed because Hedy was a woman. It is only years later, that we realize how intelligent and powerful she was. I loved the way Marie Benedict vividly described the landscape and scenery in Austria, and the Hollywood scene. I would highly recommend this amazing novel for readers who enjoy Historical Fiction. I received an ARC from NetGalley for my honest review. 3 likes
Etain 8 days ago
The Only Woman in the Room is an extraordinary book! Hedy Lamarr was known for her acting and incredible beauty, but few knew of her scientific mind. Marie Benedict has fleshed out Miss Lamarr's story of not only escaping from Austria and World War II, but also from an abusive husband who was known as the "Merchant of Death". Lamarr's fans knew only of her war efforts to sell bonds, not of her unjammable frequency-hopping invention. An invention that would improve communication to torpedoes, and that continues to be a part of our everyday lives. This is a thoroughly researched, superbly written, and absolutely fascinating book. Historical fiction at its finest. Thank you NetGalley for the advance copy.
Anonymous 8 days ago
Fascinating. What a woman! An absolute must-read.
JulieMT 5 days ago
If they gave 1/2 stars, this book would be 3 and 1/2 stars! This was a fascinating story that left me wanting more! “The Only Women in the Room” is the story of Hedy Lemarr and her daring escape from Nazi German, her rise to Hollywood stardom and her laser focus on contributing to the Allies’ war success. And while it is both beautifully written and researched I found myself left with wanting more of the story. Interestingly it seems that the intriguing story of Hedy Lemarr does, in fact, continue beyond the events of the book. I believe including more of her story in the novel would have been a good thing! Hedy Lemarr was a well-known beauty of the 1940s who was so much more then Hollywood wanted us to know. And while the story “The Only Woman in the Room” covers is fascinating I can only think the book could have been much more if dove a little deeper and continued exploring this amazing character. There is no doubt though that this book will hold your interest and quite possibly lead you to research more about this woman full of contradictions. And, this is exactly what I hope for in historical fiction and why the book is well worth the read! I was honored to receive a free advance copy of the book from NetGalley and the Publisher, Source Books Landmark in exchange for an honest review.
Tangen 8 days ago
historical-figures, historical-novel Interesting historical novel with a political agenda. Too much novelization for my taste, and the stance that the ONLY reason for the rejection of the plans for the torpedo launching device was that she was female is nonsense. Try the additions that neither she nor her male design partner were military OR possessed of what would be viewed as the appropriate academic degrees (try Why is Science Still a Boys Club). And the odd portrayal of her biological Jewishness without her apparent knowledge is disturbing. I expected better and was disappointed. I requested and received a free ebook copy from SOURCEBOOKS Landmark via NetGalley.