The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

by Francis Parkman

NOOK Book(eBook)

$0.99 View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

Chios Classics brings literature's greatest works back to life for new generations.  All our books contain a linked table of contents.


The Oregon Trail is an account of the famous trail during the middle of the 19th century.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781531281205
Publisher: Ozymandias Press
Publication date: 03/28/2018
Sold by: StreetLib SRL
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 222,987
File size: 715 KB

About the Author

Francis Parkman was born in Boston in 1823 and is best known for his masterly seven-volume history, France and England in North America, and for the annual prize awarded by the Society of American Historians in his honor. He died in 1893.

David Levin was the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. His books on American historical writing included History as Romatic Art: Bancroft, Prescott, Motley, and Parkman; In Defense of Historical Literature; and Cotton Mather: The Young Life of the Lord’s Remembrancer, 1663–1703. He was the editor of Francis Parkman’s masterpiece, France and England in North America.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Oregon Trail 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
Budd More than 1 year ago
Thomas Parkman paints a very clear and detailed picture of life among the Dakota Indians prior to the American Civil War. It is very intriguing to see what life was like and how this group of native americans and whites got along in the pre-civil war era. It also shows the thoughts of the time that helped to lead to the almost total annihilation of the Great Bison Herds of the Great Plains. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in getting a deeper understanding of the American West.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love old books the best because they really tell it like it is, before everyone started worrying about being politically correct. Francis Parkman killed buffalo for sport, thought Indians were second class citizens and pretty much lived the Oregon trail the way it was at the time, believing the things that a lot of people believed then. That is real history, like it or not. He seemed aware of what the white man was doing to the Indians but didn't seem too concerned, that is how it was lived back then. That's how I want to read it, not the Hollywood version. An awesome book!
Ann Crawford More than 1 year ago
A book quite descriptive of long gone places, people and activities on the trail west. I can easily imagine the difficulties of life traveling through indian territory. The author was there in 1846 and you sense the reality of his point of view from the actual time.
lloannna on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to see the frontier, as a well-educated young Eastern man, in the days when you really would need to worry about Indians taking your scalp, and there were no showers or electricity back home to miss? This book pretty much shows you.The author is a twenty-something Harvard educated man - think of John Adams or Robert Gould Shaw here - in the 1840s, who enthusiastically roams the world in search of adventure and edification and things to write home about. He lies to his mother and tells her he's taking the safe route to Fort Bridger, all he knows about Mormons is that they're really religious and people in Missouri hate them, and his attitude towards hunting buffalo can be summed up with: "they're stupid, you can kill a million of the males and not hurt the species since Indians kill only cows, they're stupid, we're hungry, they're stupid, when they're all dead the Indians will die off too, they're really, really stupid, and killing is fun, whee!" He also, by the way, is really ill for most of his adventures - he details many weeks of lying on the ground unable to function, trying to ride a horse without falling into unconsciousness, and taking drugs he suspects will poison him just because there was a chance it'd make him feel better.The author is judgmental and, from our perspective, remarkably unkind. He's also brutally honest, especially considering that the insults and criticism of fellow Easterners was always written for publication. Later in life, he went back and changed a lot of the things he said in this book - that was after the Civil War, after polygamy scandals and the invention of the telegraph, after he was respected and married and so forth. The Oxford World's Classics edition is pretty much what he first wrote, so it's rougher and there's a lot more "look how smart I am, quoting ancient Latin poetry from memory" silliness than are found in other editions. He became one of the most famous and influential Western historians in the later 19th century.I definitely recommend it for people who are interested in the period, especially since it's first person. Someday everything you write today will be 160 years old; a certain amount of sympathy and understanding will, I promise you, take you a long way.(about the buffalo: no buffalo dies before page 220 or so, that wasn't killed for a good reason and put to the best usage it could be; some of the later stuff is gross and beyond excessive from a 21st century standpoint, but seriously, guys, this was the 1840s, and there were no grocery stores on the plains.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago