The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Audio CD(Unabridged CD)

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Overview

Oscar Wilde's story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is one of his most popular works. Written in Wilde's characteristically dazzling manner, full of stinging epigrams and shrewd observations, the tale of Dorian Gray's moral disintegration caused something of a scandal when it first appeared in 1890. Wilde was attacked for his decadence and corrupting influence, and a few years later the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde's homosexual liaisons, trials that resulted in his imprisonment. Of the book's value as autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, "Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be--in other ages, perhaps."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400109487
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 09/01/2008
Series: Tantor Unabridged Classics
Edition description: Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 5.30(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Irish playwright Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was born to successful Dublin intellects. This afforded him the opportunity to study at the university level, where he became known for his involvement in the art movement emphasizing the beauty of art rather than the political value. Along with being a playwright, Wilde also wrote essays, novels, and poems, most famous for his play The Importance of Being Earnest, and writings The Picture of Dorian Gray, and De Profundis.

Paul Lincoln is seasoned voicalist with a career spanning more than a decade. Mr. Lincoln is an accomplished Narrator from the UK with a versatile voice with a good ear for accents, able to adapt style to project requirements, ranging from character voices to straight reads.

Date of Birth:

October 16, 1854

Date of Death:

November 30, 1900

Place of Birth:

Dublin, Ireland

Place of Death:

Paris, France

Education:

The Royal School in Enniskillen, Dublin, 1864; Trinity College, Dublin, 1871; Magdalen College, Oxford, England, 1874

Read an Excerpt

Dorian made no answer, but passed listlessly in front of his picture and turned towards it. When he saw it he drew back, and his cheeks flushed for a moment with pleasure. A look of joy came into his eyes, as if he had recognized himself for the first time. He stood there motionless and in wonder, dimly conscious that Hallward was speaking to him, but not catching the meaning of his words. The sense of his own beauty came on him like a revelation. He had never felt it before. Basil Hallwards's compliments has seemed to him to be merely the charming exaggerations of friendship. He had listened to them, laughed at them, forgotten them. They had not influenced his nature. Then had come Lord Henry Wotton with his strange panegyric on youth, his terrible warning of its brevity. That had stirred him at the time, and now, as he stood gazing at the shadow of his own loveliness, the full reality of the description flashed across him. Yes, there would be a day when his face would be wrinkled and wizen, his eyes dim and colourless, the grace of his figure broken and deformed. The scarlet would pass away from his lips, and the gold steal from his hair. The life that was to make his soul would mar his body. He would become dreadful, hideous, and uncouth.

As he thought of it, a sharp pang of pain struck though him like a knife, and made each delicate fibre of his nature quiver. His eyes deepened into amethyst, and across them came a mist of tears. He felt as is a hand of ice had been laid upon his heart.

'Don't you like it?' cried Hallward at last, stung a little by the lad's silence, not understanding what it meant.

'Of course he likes it,' said Lord Henry. 'Who wouldn't like it? It is one of the greatest things in modern art. I will give you anything you like to ask for it. I must have it.'

'It is not my property, Harry.'

'Whose property is it?'

'Dorian's, of course,' answered the painter.

'He's a very lucky fellow.'

'How sad it is!' murmured Dorian Gary, with his eyes still fixed upon his own portrait. 'How sad it is! I shall grow old, and horrible, and dreadful. It will never be older than this particular day of June...If it were only the other way!

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Picture of Dorian Gray"
by .
Copyright © 2003 Oscar Wilde.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

5 The preface

7 Chapter 1

20 Chapter 2

35 Chapter 3

47 Chapter 4

62 Chapter 5

74 Chapter 6

82 Chapter 7

94 Chapter 8

108 Chapter 9

118 Chapter 10

127 Chapter 11

146 Chapter 12

153 Chapter 13

160 Chapter 14

173 Chapter 15

182 Chapter 16

191 Chapter 17

198 Chapter 18

208 Chapter 19

218 Chapter 20

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Simon Prebble perfectly achieves Lord Henry's 'low, languid voice' and sparkling conversation, while avidly expressing the other characters' more torrid emotions." —-AudioFile

Customer Reviews