What Men Live By

What Men Live By

by Leo Tolstoy

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Overview

A shoemaker named Simon, who had neither house nor land of his own, lived with his wife and children in a peasant's hut, and earned his living by his work. Work was cheap, but bread was dear, and what he earned he spent for food. The man and his wife had but one sheepskin coat between them for winter wear, and even that was torn to tatters, and this was the second year he had been wanting to buy sheep-skins for a new coat. Before winter Simon saved up a little money: a three-rouble note lay hidden in his wife's box, and five roubles and twenty kopeks were owed him by customers in the village.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781539126089
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 09/29/2016
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 470,669
Product dimensions: 5.98(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.07(d)

About the Author

A Russian author of novels, short stories, plays, and philosophical essays, Count Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) was born into an aristocratic family and is best known for the epic books War and Peace and Anna Karenina, regarded as two of the greatest works of Russian literature. After serving in the Crimean War, Tolstoy retired to his estate and devoted himself to writing, farming, and raising his large family. His novels and outspoken social polemics brought him world-wide fame.

Date of Birth:

September 9, 1828

Date of Death:

November 20, 1910

Place of Birth:

Tula Province, Russia

Place of Death:

Astapovo, Russia

Education:

Privately educated by French and German tutors; attended the University of Kazan, 1844-47

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What Men Live by 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
kiwikowalski on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Originally written for an audience of children, peasants, and the newly-literate, this short story is simple and easy to understand. It is a religious parable, but can be enjoyed by anyone as a critique of morality and the best way to live life. This work is entertaining the entire way through, and is surprising and thought-provoking on many levels. It can be interpreted as simply as it is written, or as philosophically as it was intended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't miss this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago