You Can Write for Children: How to Write Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers

You Can Write for Children: How to Write Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers

by Chris Eboch

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Overview

Remember the magic of bedtime stories? When you write for children, you have the most appreciative audience in the world. But to reach that audience, you need to write fresh, dynamic stories, whether you're writing rhymed picture books, middle grade mysteries, edgy teen novels, nonfiction, or something else.

In this book, you will learn:

  • How to explore the wide variety of age ranges, genres, and styles in writing stories, articles and books for young people.
  • How to find ideas.
  • How to develop an idea into a story, article, or book.
  • The basics of character development, plot, setting, and theme.
  • How to use point of view, dialogue, and thoughts.
  • How to edit your work and get critiques.
  • Where to learn more on various subjects.

This book focuses on the craft of writing for children. It will help you get started, through straightforward information and exercises you can do on your own or with critique partners. If you've been writing for awhile but feel your writing education has gaps, this guide can help you work through those weak points. The author shares examples from her own work and teaching experience, as well as interviews and advice with published writers and industry professionals.

Whether you're just starting out or have some experience, this book will make you a better writer - and encourage you to have fun! The fascinating world of Kid Lit awaits!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780692469774
Publisher: Pig River Press
Publication date: 06/25/2015
Pages: 164
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.35(d)

About the Author

Chris Eboch writes fiction and nonfiction for all ages, with over 30 traditionally published books for children. Her novels for ages nine and up include The Genie's Gift, a middle eastern fantasy; The Eyes of Pharaoh, a mystery in ancient Egypt; The Well of Sacrifice, a Mayan adventure; Bandits Peak, a survival story, and the Haunted series, which starts with The Ghost on the Stairs. Her book Advanced Plotting helps writers fine-tune their plots. Learn more at www.chriseboch.com.

Chris is a Regional Advisor Emerita for SCBWI and has given popular writing workshops around the world. Chris also writes novels of suspense and romance for adults under the name Kris Bock; read excerpts at www.krisbock.com.

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You Can Write for Children: How to Write Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Roy T. James for Readers' Favorite You Can Write for Children by Chris Eboch explains how to explore the wide variety of age ranges, genres, and styles in writing stories, articles, and books for young people. Chris suggests a five-step approach, beginning with a study of existing literature as well as current trends. As the next step, the process of finding new ideas is examined, followed by further development of the idea, a catchy title and related issues. Points of view suitable for different types of books, nonfiction, drama etc are then identified and, as the final step, formation of characters and building conflict is analyzed. The settings for fiction as well as creative nonfiction techniques are also included in this book. You Can Write for Children by Chris Eboch discloses the secrets behind the magic of bedtime stories. To reach children, the most appreciative audience in the world, all that is needed is to concentrate on writing fresh, dynamic stories. The book gives various hints regarding availability of resources to make rhymed picture books, middle grade mysteries, edgy teen novels, nonfiction, or something else. The book also makes the importance of diversity clear: the more varied our short stories, novels, and nonfiction are, the better we’ll be equipped to face the real market, and young people will be able to find a book of their choice. This book looks at all aspects of ‘how’ to write, and much of ‘what’ to write and other questions, leaving the prospective author with very few problems but to write.